Guest blog post from Kristian Still.

Authoring with Office Mix really was straightforward. I plugged in a cheap (freebie) webcam, headset and mic, opened a familiar PowerPoint presentation resource and cracked on. The Mix tab was simple enough. Click “record” and use the arrow icons to move through the slide animations, adding the teaching points as you go. I throw in a few pregnant pauses (although students can pause the video at any time of cause) and directed a couple of learning activities that we would have undertaken in class.

Although I would happily receive feedback, please forgive any technical errors. I was really focusing on the resource itself, exploring what Office Mix had to offer, rather than the accuracy of my teaching. That said, in just 20 minutes I had created a pseudo lesson recap resource; a resource for students who either wanted/needed to recap the content of the lesson or who perhaps missed the lesson? A resource that I was fairly happy with.

MIX1

All the PowerPoint animations, audio and video narration carries over and I thought that the post production video resizing and locating was an excellent idea. Conversely, having to remove a embedded audio clip from the original presentation was awkward?

MIX2

Inking (writing) onto the presentation is easy enough, (plenty of colours and pen types) and I am sure it would be even easier on a tablet (as my effort shows). Which makes me think that my colleague, Maths teacher and Windows tablet user, Aidan Sproat, would really like Office Mix.

MIX3

Even without exploring the quizzing or screen casting features, or the associated analytics, Office Mix has a lot to offer.

Screen casting / inking clearly lends itself to some subjects more than others however I can see no good reason why you would develop some of your PowerPoint presentations into perpetual learning resources by road testing Office Mix.

View Kristian’s first Office Mix by clicking the image below.

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