Today, I’m in London, and inspired by Alan’s IT Suite Photosynth yesterday, I thought I’d have a go. And I am astounded at how easy it turned out to be.

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I took my photos of Westminster Cathedral, which is right outside of our office. Just before you say “But that’s not Westminster”, then re-read the last sentence. It’s the Roman Catholic Westminster Cathedral, not Westminster Abbey.

Before I first worked in Victoria Street, I had no idea that this impressive building was a few hundreds yards from the Abbey. It is well described on its website: “Westminster Cathedral is one of the greatest secrets of London; people heading down Victoria Street on the well-trodden route to more famous sites are astonished to come across a piazza opening up the view to an extraordinary facade of towers, balconies and domes.”

Anyway, I stood in front of it, and kept taking photos – 103 of them – including close ups of the statuary, and the left hand-side of the building, and then loaded them into the Photosynth software. I didn’t have to tag them, or arrange them, or shoot in any particular order – it did all of the work. And after about an hour (analysis, upload and display time, I guess) that was it – a 3D model of the cathedral was made.

You can see a snapshot of a part of it on the right, and you can see my whole synth here.

I tried a few tricks, to see how they would work:

  • Walking in the left-hand door, and you can too, but the lighting made it impossible to take photos inside - LINK
  • A close up of the notice board by the door – LINK spot the bargain!
  • And a view around the side, with a close up of the mosaic over the door – LINK

I was astounded at the “3D dot” model it created, as it is an amazing trick from a few photos!

Have a go at Photosynth yourself. I think this whole model took less than 30 minutes of my time (plus the background uploading)!