Yesterday, I wrote about the Innovative Schools videos – four schools, two hours of video, 187 pages of supporting documentation and hundreds of ideas.

The question from day one of the project was “How do we make this digestible?”. You know the situation – somebody has a great series of videos, so they pop it onto a DVD and then post one to every school in the country. I’m pretty sure that within reach of your desk, you’'ll have one of those DVDs in a folder – from an acronym organisation like Becta, NCSL, DCSF, QCA or SSAT – which you feel you really must get round to watching some day. But you haven’t found the time yet – even though it arrived two terms ago!

Well, we wanted to avoid that. So we won’t be giving away DVDs at BETT, or sending your head teacher a folder for her to pass on to somebody else.

Instead, we’re going to let the resources sell themselves. We’ve put together a great trailer video, which gives a bit of an insight into what’s in the full videos – it is designed to appeal to those who are itching for change, as well as those who aren’t. It will hopefully sell the idea that change can be good and can help raise standards. And it will challenge those who think that they can resist change!

But you can judge that for yourself. I’ve been fortunate to present this video to a wide range of people in 1:1 briefings, and have seen a range of positive reactions. But letting you watch it is the ultimate test:

(If you’re not using Silverlight – shame – then here’s the direct link)

Does it get you interested in the rest of the work? The whole website is open for you to explore

If you noticed any similarity to Shift Happens in a couple of the student statements, then you’re not mistaken. When I created the UK version of Shift Happens, I hadn’t really understood how many people would be downloading it, emailing me, and showing it at conferences. (If I had known, I’d have changed the iPhone photo for sure!). But given the way that Shift Happens went completely viral – and the way that the slides I’d added for the UK Education audience have been referenced in so many other places – I thought it was worth developing the story further. I don’t know yet if this video has the same power as Shift Happens, but one of the lessons learnt is that it, and the rest of the material, doesn’t emphasise Microsoft – that’s one of the reasons we’ve branded it very differently. We have tried to be very balanced, and present a great school story – it is definitely NOT a Microsoft story.