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If you’re like me, you’ve been bought up using Office. As each new version comes along, you discover new features, and you latch onto them. I remember when Pivot Tables were first introduced into Excel, and how it made life so much easier. I still find myself wanting to use the new animations in each version of PowerPoint, just to stay one step ahead of colleagues.

But what happens if you’re not somebody who rushes straight into the latest version of software, to discover what it can now do? How many of the colleagues that you work with in your school don’t know the features which will make their life easier? To be honest, they aren’t going to read the 500+ pages in the latest Office product guides for Office 2010, nor did they do that for Office 2007. Or even for Office 2003.

Which means that only some of your teachers know that Track Changes in Word is brilliant commenting on and marking essays. Or that OneNote is a really useful for pulling lesson plans together, as well as for students to do research.

So the "Teachers guide to Office" might be just the thing to print out and leave laying around the staff room. It works for Office 2007 and Office 2010, and there are only 4 pages to it. It would be perfect as a teaser for a training afternoon, if you’re planning anything for the end of term?

It’ll also look very nice on a table near the lovely Office posters.