It used to be a skill needed mainly by secretaries and those in a typing pool, but nowadays the majority of us spend hours a day on computers, tablets and smart phones for work or social purposes.

According to new research, almost 60% of us rate our typing skills as average or poor, with one in five admitting to using their two index fingers, almost a third having to look at the keyboard to make sure they’re hitting the right keys, and only 18% saying they can touch type.

imageThat’s despite the fact that more than 60% of us think typing is a core life skill, while almost a third believe children should be offered extra typing skills tuition and a certain level of typing proficiency should be a necessary requirement on the national curriculum.

So just how important is keyboard style to our typing proficiency and how can we raise ourselves up from a nation of two finger typists? Microsoft has launched a nationwide Great British Type Off to challenge the nation on their typing skills. Before that though, watch our video with Liz Davis a tutor and typing expert from Pitman Training College, and Professor John Sutherland – Lecturer in English Literature, University College London and discover our top typing tips!

Check out the video here:

Check out the National results so far

57% of us rate our typing skills as average or poor
61% of think typing is a core life skill which should be taught in schools
18% admit to using their two index fingers
18% say they can touch type
29% believe children should be offered extra typing skills tuition and a certain level of typing proficiency should be a necessary requirement on the national curriculum

If you’re keen to rate your typing skills, come and see us at BETT, you won’t miss is… we’re the ones with the campervan, stand D251

The research for Microsoft was carried out by Opinion Matters between: 03/10/2013 and 08/10/2013

Sample: 2030 UK adults who type regularly

All research conducted adheres to the MRS Codes of Conduct (2010) in the UK and ICC/ESOMAR World Research Guidelines. Opinion Matters is registered with the Information Commissioner's Office and is fully compliant with the Data Protection Act (1998).