Tablets for Schools supported UK Hour of Code Week (3rd-9thMarch) with new research: 

“Three quarters of teachers believe coding relevant but over a third not confident to teach it”

With coding set to enter the school curriculum in September 2014, Tablets for Schools today released research showing that three quarters of school leaders believe that coding and computer programming will be relevant to their pupils, but over a third do not feel confident about implementing coding into the curriculum. http://www.tabletsforschools.org.uk/coding-research-teachers-students-motivated-to-code-but-lack-confidence-in-their-abilities/ Tablets for Schools (educational not for profit, soon to be charity) surveyed 36 school leaders and 3,500 secondary school boys and girls aged 11-17 in 9 schools across England and Scotland in Jan and Feb 2014. All the schools have been using one-to-one Tablets for over a year or have introduced them in the current school year and are taking part in the Tablets for Schools research programme.

This survey of pupils and teachers using one to one Tablets shows:

  • Nearly half, (48%) of pupils not taught coding at school say they would like to be taught;
  • Three-quarters (74%) of the leadership say that coding/computer programming will be relevant to their pupils giving    them core skills for the workforce of the future;
  • Teachers thought that learning how to code will also help develop important mathematical and scientific skills;
  • However while nearly a half (46%) feel confident about the introduction into the school, over a third 36% do not feel confident.

Quotes from Teachers

“We are living in a world where we are educating children for jobs that might not yet exist, so they need the skills of being able to critically analyse processes.”

“The development of sequencing, logic and programming is useful in developing scientific and mathematical skills”.

Being able to identify and train staff appears to be the biggest challenge to these schools. “Confident in my own abilities; less confident in the abilities of my fellow primary practitioners and in being able to train them!” “We are aware lots of training will be necessary to help staff develop the skills.”

Speaking on the publication of this research Sebastian James, Vice Chair T4S and

CEO Dixons Retail said:

“Schools that have introduced one to one Tablets have been given a head start when it comes to coding. Tablet using schools that have been teaching computing skills and coding for several years feel well-prepared and confident in

their ability to implement the new curriculum changes, others feel less certain. Being able to identify and train staff appears to be the biggest challenge to these schools.”

Tablets for Schools research has shown that schools that prepare and integrate tablets as part of their pedagogical approach benefit with more engaged students, who learn collaboratively and develop a confidence around presenting ideas in class. The Tablets for Schools free toolkit can help schools start their tablet journey.


For more information please contact David Mencer on 020 7067 0771 or 07775 840557

or david@tabletsforschools.org.uk @T4STweets


About Tablets for Schools

Tablets for Schools is passionate about the transformative effect of tablets in the classroom and beyond. We

are a not-for-profit (shortly to be charity) education campaign bringing together teachers, industry leaders

and academics using robust and independent research on how tablets impact learning and attainment. Our

research and expertise of how to set up and get the best from tablets are made freely available to teachers,

schools and Government.


About this Survey

The research talked to pupils, and school leadership. The pupil survey was sent to nine secondary schools

which have been using one-to-one Tablets for over a year or have introduced them in the current school

year and are taking part in the Tablets for Schools research programme. In total over 3,500 responses were

received (total 3,542) from pupils aged 11-18 (49% girls and 51% boys). 36 school leaders were

interviewed between 12 – 27 February 2014.Survey carried out by Family, Kids and Youth (independent,

education specialist research agency).