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  • Blog Post: BizTalk–Map Incoming Message to a string Field

    In a recent project I worked, one of the requirements was to copy the entire incoming message to a String Field. Consider the incoming message <ns0:TestNode xmlns:ns0=" http://testEnvelope.SourceSchema" >   < FieldOne>FieldOne_0</FieldOne>   < FieldTwo>FieldTwo_0<...
  • Blog Post: .NET 4.5 - Information of Caller Function (Caller Attributes in .NET 4.5)

    While debugging code “Who called my function ?” is  a million dollar question. Knowing the origin of your function call is in many cases the first step in debugging any code. Until now a few ways of doing this were to look at the CallStack in visual studio or  a debugger or the most common...
  • Blog Post: Object.ReferenceEquals(valueVar, valueVar) will always return false

    The ReferenceEquals method is usually used to determine if two objects are the same instance. But you need to be a bit cautious when you use it with Value Types. Consider the following code. static void Main( string [] args) { int valueVar = 15; if (Object.ReferenceEquals(valueVar, valueVar...
  • Blog Post: Adding Icons to your custom IIS 7.0 Manager UI Modules

    There is a lot of enthusiasm around building IIS UI modules that show up in the IIS Manager. The extensibility model that IIS 7.0 ships with is great and provides a lot of opportunity for developers to come up with nifty modules. One thing that developers miss out is to add an icon for the UI module...
  • Blog Post: Preventing ildasm from disassembling your assembly

    The MSIL Disassembler (ildasm.exe) is a neat tool that can be used to view the MSIL code of a .Net assembly/dll. Many of you should have used it to peek into assemblies while debugging/troubleshooting. I use it a lot to check assembly namespaces and stuff while debugging. But when I tried to disassemble...
  • Blog Post: SOS your Visual Studio

    If you as a developer are interested in taking quick peeks into memory allocation you can load SOS (Son Of Strike) in Visual Studio to do that. SOS is written as a WinDbg extension but can load in Visual Studio and do most of the stuff. To begin with you will have to go to the Properties of the project...
  • Blog Post: A tryst with MSIL

    Any ASP.NET developer should be knowing that when his/her .NET application is compiled, the high-level code written in C# or Visual Basic .NET is compiled into the intermediate language MSIL. It is this MSIL that the Common Language Runtime (CLR) actually expects when the application is run. The CLR...
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