Your Visual Studio, Your Colors

Your Visual Studio, Your Colors

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Since releasing Visual Studio 2012 we have continued on our investment in the user experience space to enable you to work more efficiently and to make the Visual Studio experience engaging and productive. One of the design principles we are following is the enablement of choice and personal customization in the product, and as part of developing the new Light and Dark themes in Visual Studio we invested in broadly extending the theme-able surface area of Visual Studio. Building on this work, I’m happy to announce that we now have available a Visual Studio 2012 Color Theme Editor extension! This extension provides you with seven new color themes to choose from as well as the ability to easily create new custom themes.

We released an early version of this extension two months ago and received great feedback, which we incorporated into this final release. One new capability we added to this final version is an easy interface for quickly finding a particular color you want to change, as well as seeing the impact of the change in a small UI snippet:

Theme Editor Editing

As noted above, the extension includes seven new sample themes to choose from or use as starting points for further customization. We’ve heard requests for a color scheme closer to Visual Studio 2010, so we have included a Blue theme that matches the 2010 color scheme as one of the choices.

Theme Editor Blue Theme

We’d love to hear your feedback on this new extension. Please share your feedback with us on the extension’s page on the gallery.

As you read this post, those of you that are fans of the Visual Studio 2010 icon collection may be asking, “what about the icons?” We currently have no plans to offer the old-style icons for Visual Studio 2012. The Visual Studio 2012 icon designs are directionally aligned with the style used across a broad range of new Microsoft products. We believe this design consistency is important, and we expect the icon styles to become familiar and comfortable over time.

We do, however, continue to look for feedback on specific new icons that lack clarity of concept or that create inefficiency in a task or flow by being difficult to distinguish. If you have such icon specific feedback, please use Connect and share it with us.

Thanks,

The Visual Studio Team

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  • The world wants the previous VS.NET look, ask any developer and the majority wants VS.NET to look better, Microsoft wants the new look.

    Keep ignoring your customers, and they will leave you when there is a good alternative, then you will end up crying like the Windows Phone team, please comeback and use our phone, we improved, yeh right.

  • Microsoft needs a new CEO, someone young, it will be nice to see him asking all the prehistoric old management to go home and hire new faces.

    I think the new colors are wonderful if you start developing alzihmer, for the rest of us, we are still young and have a lot to do, give us some nice colors.

  • I can't hear that complaining and whining anymore. If you want your glossy woody metallic whatever realistic overloaded designs back or the non-depth 3d look of Windows Classic, then use your old applications and don't work with modern programs with modern interfaces.

  • I've got to say, as someone who HATED the preview versions of VS2012, that I've grown to like the new UI. I have the color scheme set back to 2010's (2012's default is too dark, IMO), and I have the terrible all-caps menus reverted to Pascal case (I sincerely believe that whoever was responsible for the supposed Metro-ization of the UI has a misguided view of Metro). But I really like the new icons (the addition of color to them makes a huge difference, and I am starting to get the use of monochrome for folders). The rest of the UI generally feels a lot more streamlined than 2010 (especially the Team Explorer pane and new tabbing system with the preview-like mode)

    Only things I don't like are the 8-bit-airbrush style toolbar thumb, the removal of double-clicking-to-maximimize-tabs feature, and some lags in the IDE when some actions are performed (it feels slower than 2010)

  • 2010 Icons please, what is the deal with all the flat black icons... I don't want a mobile experience on my 21" monitor and I don't want to stare at black icons on my 65 million colors monitor.

  • Since releasing Visual Studio 2012 we have continued on our investment in the user experience space to enable you to work more efficiently and to make the Visual Studio experience engaging and productive. One of the design principles we are following is the enablement of choice and personal customization in the product,

    where is the customization of the product (icons) and 2012 has decreased the DEVLOPERS experiece

  • If the icons aren't changing because of consistency with other products, why doesn't Office have this butt-ugly look?

    It's hard to buy this story. More likely that someone thought it was a good idea and now when they realize how terrible the design actually is, it's too late to undo it. Hopefully the team working on 2014 learns something from this failure.

  • we (all developers) want VS 2010 icons

  • Just revert the f*cked UI back to VS2010!

  • Return the VS2010 icons, these flat colorless icons are eye strain city.

  • I HATE THIS NEW LOOK AND THE FACT YOU FORCE ME TO LOOK AT THIS AND I CANNOT CHANGE IT BACK TO THE LOOK I'M USED TO FOR MANY YEARS SHOWS THAT YOU DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR USERS.

    AND I'M GOING TO USE ALL CAPS UNTIL YOU CHANGE THE STUPID UPPER CASE MENU.

  • Wow that's amazing too cool i think

  • Microsoft's refusal to acknowledge the UI preferences of nearly every developer here demonstrates staggering arrogance.  Rather than force-feed your loyal* customers the Metro UI, which we CLEARLY and OVERWHELMINGLY hate, why not actually LISTEN to us for a change?

    * For now, at least

  • "we have continued on our investment in the user experience space to enable you to work more efficiently and to make the Visual Studio experience engaging and productive"

    To really make it more productive, take out the psyzoid jitters... EI: Add the c++ disable "Auto Quick Info" option to C#:

    Tools->Options->Text Editor->C/C++->Advanced->Auto Quick Info = False

    I've already done it, but I'm sure many other users don't want to see "string ..." pop up every time the cursor goes over a string.

  • PS: The new flat, colorless icons are useless. I still have to pause a second every time one needs clicking and often have to hunt several seconds (ei~selection: alignment, make same size, etc...). Also, the webforms templates install several versions of jquery for a new website. This harks back to the MS Frontpage days when MS didn't get it and littered pages w/tags. Or, when MS was a noob w/css and polluted every element w/css mu.

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