Microsoft

June, 2012

Introducing Microsoft
Azure Intelligent
Systems Service
How big data
creates new
marketing options
for retailers
Enabling productivity
with the
Internet of Things
Innovate data management
With Windows Server R2
for Embedded Systems

bloggers

discussions

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    What is lockdown and branding in Windows Embedded Standard 8, and where are my EEFs?

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    Over the next week we’re going to have a small series highlighting various Lockdown features on Windows Embedded Standard 8. In this first post Kevin Asgari gives us an overview of the Lockdown and Branding features found in Windows Embedded Standard 8. Kevin is a Writer for the Windows Embedded team and in his spare time enjoys reading, skiing, visiting wineries, and spending time with family.

    Windows Embedded Standard provides a building block version of the Windows operating system, enabling you to create a smaller, customized version of Windows by removing functionality that your device does not need. In addition, Windows Embedded Standard provides additional functionality for embedded devices that is not available in the full Windows OS. In Windows Embedded Standard 7 and earlier, we called these new features “embedded enabling features”, or EEFs for short.

    However, “embedded enabling features” is not a very descriptive term. In Windows Embedded Standard 8, we now call these features lockdown and branding features.

    Lockdown features enable you to provide a controlled device experience, mainly by limiting the ways in which an end user can interact with the device. For example, your device may be a dedicated cashier device that runs a full screen cashier application, and you may want to prevent users from being able to use Windows shortcut keys like Alt+Tab to switch out of the application, or Alt+4 to close the application.

    Branding features enable you to hide or change many of the parts of the OS that identify it as a Windows product. You may want the devices your company produces to show only your company’s branding to your customers for better brand recognition, or you may want to hide the underlying OS so that end users are less likely to try to break out of the tailored device experience.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Maximizing Internet Explorer in Windows Embedded Compact 7

    Posted By David Campbell
    Program Manager

    I’d like to welcome Doug Boling back as a guest blogger. Doug has another interesting topic this month, the customization of Windows Embedded Compact’s Internet Explorer for Embedded. As a quick introduction again, Doug has been working for many years with Windows Embedded Compact and Windows Embedded CE. He is an author, trainer and consultant specializing in Windows Embedded Compact and CE. Doug also does monthly webcasts on a variety of Windows Embedded Compact topics, like this one, that I would encourage you to check out. You can learn more about Doug by visiting his website at www.bolingconsulting.com.

    Windows Embedded Compact has a customized version of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer named Internet Explorer (IE) for Embedded. This powerful browser can be used in a number of ways in an embedded system to enhance the functionality of the system. This post will discuss the various ways to tune, customize and even embed IE for Embedded inside embedded applications.

    IE for Embedded is a customized version of Internet Explorer 7 for the desktop with performance enhancements from IE 8 added as well. Specifically, the JScript engine brought from IE 8 provides a 400% performance improvement over the original IE 7 scripting engine. In addition gesture support along with zoom and pan support is in this browser.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Get a lift with SYNC

    Posted By Chris Elliott
    Senior Marketing Communications Manager

    Microsoft and Ford want to chauffeur you, a friend and gdgt co-founder Peter Rojas in the all-new 2013 Ford Edge to gdgt live in New York on Monday, June 25! Along the way, you and your guest will experience the latest version of Ford SYNC with MyFord Touch and see firsthand why SYNC, powered by Microsoft, is one of the leading in-car infotainment systems in the industry.

    What’s better than being chauffeured through the streets of Manhattan in a brand-new Ford crossover while getting one-on-one time with gdgt co-founder Peter Rojas to chat about the latest tech gadgets (some of which you might even find in the car)? Plus, once you’re at the event, you’ll be able to participate in the VIP hour, where you can get to know some of the hottest names in consumer electronics, getting your hands on the latest gadgets and hot tech before any of your other friends.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Modules in Windows Embedded Standard 8

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    As you may have noticed from our Community Technology Previews for Windows Embedded Standard 8, there have been some tweaks to how various technologies are represented and grouped in our toolkits, and they are not just cosmetic changes. Windows Embedded Standard 8 introduces the concept of modules, replacing the packages that were in Windows Embedded Standard 7 and providing more flexibility and enhanced functionality. In this post, Dave Massy gives an overview of modules and how they will change your development experience in Windows Embedded Standard 8. Dave is a Program Manager working on the componentization team of Windows Embedded. When not spending time with his young son and daughter, he enjoys driving his 1958 Jaguar XK 150 around the Puget Sound area. Additionally, Dave derives great pleasure from replacing any Z he finds with the letter S to properly conform to the Queen’s English.

    Introduction

    In Windows Embedded Standard 8 there are subtle changes from Windows Embedded Standard 7 in how we expose individual technologies as building blocks for creating your OS These building blocks allow you to create an OS image that matches your needs and not include functionality you do not need.

    In Windows Embedded Standard 7 we referred to the building blocks of the OS as packages. In Windows Embedded Standard 8, they are modules. Packages and modules may seem similar because you use them to build up a functional image. However, under the hood there are technical differences that allow us to improve the overall experience of using the catalog and defining an image that meets your needs. For instance, one of the key advantages is that third-party modules can be in the catalog alongside OS modules. You can even create your own modules using the Module Designer tool that is included in the Windows Embedded Standard 8 toolkit.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Easily Managing Your Lockdown Features

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    Today I’m going to share a demo of something pretty awesome with you guys. Not as awesome as the recently announced Microsoft Surface tablet, but it’s still pretty cool. On Monday, we gave an overview of all the lockdown features on Windows Embedded Standard 8, and today I’m going to be showing you how you can easily manage those lockdown features by using the Unified Configuration Tool (UCT), a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in.

    UCT comes as part of the Windows Embedded Standard 8 toolkit and can be installed by running emblockSetup_amd64.msi or embblockSetup_x86.msi (depending on your developer machine’s architecture). Download our second Community Technology Preview (CTP2) to try it out. With the tool, the lockdown features on your Windows Embedded devices can be remotely or locally managed by graphical user interface. From changing your custom shell for Shell Launcher to selecting what processes to block with Dialog Filter, there is a lot that UCT lets you configure.

    With some help from Brendan Rempel, a developer working on UCT, I created the following video that shows you UCT in action and teaches you more about it.

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