Microsoft

October, 2012

Introducing Microsoft
Azure Intelligent
Systems Service
How big data
creates new
marketing options
for retailers
Enabling productivity
with the
Internet of Things
Innovate data management
With Windows Server R2
for Embedded Systems

bloggers

discussions

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Visual Studio 2012 to Support Windows Embedded Compact

    Posted By David Campbell
    Program Manager

    At the recent Visual Studio launch event, it was confirmed that Visual Studio 2012 will once again include support for Windows Embedded Compact.   Included in that support we’re targeting much of the newest compiler and tools functionality, most notable of which includes new compiler features such as C++11 language standards, faster more efficient code generated, an updated CRT, auto-parallelization and auto-vectorization  (Wow, that’s a mouthful.), range based loops, RValue references, and more.   Also included will be an updated version of .net CF which has greatly improved performance, particularly around memory allocation and garbage collection - using the “generational” garbage collector.  This not only provides more performance, but more predictability in the execution of applications.

    More information about the new Visual Studio, including support for Compact, can be found at the Visual Studio Launch site. (Yes, I’m in the video and no, I’m not going to be able to make a living in front of the camera.   But it’s the message that’s important here.)

    Be sure to check back in the future as we release more information on the upcoming Windows Embedded Compact release.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Compact

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Remote Desktop Connection 8 Client Update for WES7 and POSReady7 Available on ECE

    Remote Desktop Connection 8 Client update for Windows Embedded Standard 7 SP1 and Windows Embedded POSReady 7 is now available on ECE.

    This update enables users using Windows Embedded Standard 7 SP1 and Windows Embedded POSReady 7  devices to connect to computers running Windows Server 2012 or Windows 8, and experience the rich user experience delivered by RemoteFX and RDP 8.0.

    For more information on the RDP 8.0 update for Windows Embedded Standard 7 SP1, please visit the Remote Desktop Services blog.

     

    Read More...

    Comments Product Updates

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Customizing the CEPC BSP in Windows Embedded Compact 7

    Posted By David Campbell
    Program Manager

    As the Windows Embedded Compact v.Next launch approaches, we will soon be posting detailed information about the Compact OS and tools, both Platform Builder (used for Board Support Packages (BSPs) as well as drivers) and the use of Visual Studio itself for developing applications on top of Compact OS images. I’m looking forward to making more of the technical details of the release available, probably in small bits until we can go fully public, which will happen very soon.

    In the meantime let’s take a detailed look at the CEPC BSP. Here’s a guest post by Doug Boling again with a great overview based on his recent webcast. (More details on Doug’s webcast series are provided at the end of the article.)

    The CEPC board support package (BSP) in Windows Embedded Compact 7 is one of the frequently used BSPs in Platform Builder. Unfortunately it is also one of the more difficult to customize. It may seem strange to customize a BSP that runs on a generic PC chassis but when used on a production embedded system, some form of customization such as splash screens or subtle changes in hardware is almost always necessary.

    The difficulty in customizing the CEPC BSP comes from its file structure. Before I can explain the problem, I need to discuss the architecture of a standard Windows Embedded Compact BSP

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Compact

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Get in SYNC with Microsoft for Ford's Random Acts of Fusion Campaign

    Posted By Chris Elliott
    Senior Marketing Communications Manager

    Believe it or not, Joel McHale, Ryan Seacrest and I have more in common than just our dashing good looks. We’re all part of Ford’s Random Acts of Fusion campaign promoting the all-new 2013 Ford Fusion.

    Ford recently held a contest to bring one lucky person to Joel’s hometown of Seattle to see all the sites. The winner, Kristina from Stillman Valley, Illinois, cruised around the Emerald City in a new Fusion and even got a behind the scenes tour of Microsoft—Ford’s technology partner in developing Ford SYNC. I was on-hand to welcome Kristina and her friend to our campus, show off our fabled Garage and show them the some of the main benefits of Ford SYNC, on a bright and sunny day—clearly it doesn’t rain here all the time.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Automotive

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Supporting Applications with Unified Write Filter

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    Hey everyone. You may have noticed posts were a bit sparser during the month of September as I was out on paternity leave spending time with my new little boy. However, I’m back and we’re ready to get the content flowing again.

    We’ve had the privilege this summer of having quite a few interns in Windows Embedded and you’ve heard from five of them including Jordan Goldberg, the author of this post. In Jordan’s first post, he told us about his summer and his work on a Windows Debugger extension for Unified Write Filter (UWF). This time, he gets technical and explains the work needed to ensure your application functions correctly on a system with UWF enabled. To see any of the previous posts from our interns, click one of the links below.

    Greetings from Redmond! Today I want to take some time to talk about a new feature in Windows Embedded Standard 8, Unified Write Filters (UWF), and the best way for adding support for applications. UWF takes the best of Enhanced Write Filter (EWF) and File-Based Write Filter (FBWF) and bundles in a few more features to create a complete Write Filter solution. As a quick overview, a Write Filter is a virtual overlay that can be applied to a volume and transparently capture all disk I/O. The overlay is then wiped each time a machine is rebooted. This can be useful in a scenario such as a public kiosk where all user data needs to be wiped after use. For more information on Unified Write Filters, check out this post.

    The issue with supporting applications with Write Filters is that by default, all I/O is redirected to an overlay and wiped after reboot. This can be problematic for applications storing information in the registry and file system since the data will be lost regularly. In UWF, the way to prevent this is to set exclusions on the registry and file locations of where this information is being stored. This will cause the data to bypasses the overlay and get written directly to disk. However, applying these exclusions is not always user friendly since it can only be done through WMI, the Embedded Lockdown Manager (ELM) or the command line utility uwfmgr.exe.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
Page 1 of 3 (13 items) 123