Microsoft

Creating cloud-connected
"intelligent" elevators
with Microsoft Azure services
Introducing Microsoft
Azure Intelligent
Systems Service
How big data
creates new
marketing options
for retailers
Enabling productivity
with the
Internet of Things

bloggers

discussions

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    The </glass> device is half full….and working

    Posted By Robert Peterson
    Sr. Product Manager

    Welcome to the ‘new’ Windows Embedded Products and Services section of the Windows Embedded team blog.

    As a quick introduction, I’m Robert Peterson, Sr. Product Manager in the Windows Embedded team. My team focuses on bringing new products and services to market around the world. This blog will cover the many ways our products and services are in the market.

    Air travel can be great, well I am told it can be, and most of us have favorite stories about going through airports. Like you I often get frustrated at long lines and delays and try to avoid them. I thought about how I could have less hassle and realized there are lots of devices that make getting in and out of the airport so much smoother that we don’t even think about. On my last trip I decided to calculate how much time all those devices could save me:

    I needed to check in (yes, I could have done this online but that would ruin the story); I used a Kiosk to check in at the entry of the airport as the lines were longer with the agents. If this Kiosk wasn’t working it would have taken me another 10 minutes to check in. Time saved: 10 min

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Easily Managing Your Lockdown Features

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    Today I’m going to share a demo of something pretty awesome with you guys. Not as awesome as the recently announced Microsoft Surface tablet, but it’s still pretty cool. On Monday, we gave an overview of all the lockdown features on Windows Embedded Standard 8, and today I’m going to be showing you how you can easily manage those lockdown features by using the Unified Configuration Tool (UCT), a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in.

    UCT comes as part of the Windows Embedded Standard 8 toolkit and can be installed by running emblockSetup_amd64.msi or embblockSetup_x86.msi (depending on your developer machine’s architecture). Download our second Community Technology Preview (CTP2) to try it out. With the tool, the lockdown features on your Windows Embedded devices can be remotely or locally managed by graphical user interface. From changing your custom shell for Shell Launcher to selecting what processes to block with Dialog Filter, there is a lot that UCT lets you configure.

    With some help from Brendan Rempel, a developer working on UCT, I created the following video that shows you UCT in action and teaches you more about it.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Get a lift with SYNC

    Posted By Chris Elliott
    Senior Marketing Communications Manager

    Microsoft and Ford want to chauffeur you, a friend and gdgt co-founder Peter Rojas in the all-new 2013 Ford Edge to gdgt live in New York on Monday, June 25! Along the way, you and your guest will experience the latest version of Ford SYNC with MyFord Touch and see firsthand why SYNC, powered by Microsoft, is one of the leading in-car infotainment systems in the industry.

    What’s better than being chauffeured through the streets of Manhattan in a brand-new Ford crossover while getting one-on-one time with gdgt co-founder Peter Rojas to chat about the latest tech gadgets (some of which you might even find in the car)? Plus, once you’re at the event, you’ll be able to participate in the VIP hour, where you can get to know some of the hottest names in consumer electronics, getting your hands on the latest gadgets and hot tech before any of your other friends.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Automotive

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Turn a Windows Embedded-based Thin Client Into a Wireless Network Analyzer

    Posted By Pavel Bansky
    Program Manager

    Thanks for checking back to Windows Embedded blog, I hope you won’t be disappointed. Today I want to write about an interesting usage of a Windows Embedded powered Thin Client. A friend of mine who works in Microsoft Support for Windows Phone was solving an interesting problem. One of the customers had issues accessing a particular webserver using Windows Phone. The webserver was using some certificate-based authentication and failed to authenticate the Windows Phone device. The question was: is it a problem with the phone or the server, or is the problem somewhere else? The first step was to capture and analyze the network traffic between the phone and server. Now, how to do it? There is nothing like WireShark for Windows Phone, so we can’t capture traffic there. Same on the server side, because the server is who knows where. So, I suggested capturing the traffic on the wireless router, but in order to do that we needed to build a router that allows network traffic to be captured.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    What is lockdown and branding in Windows Embedded Standard 8, and where are my EEFs?

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    Over the next week we’re going to have a small series highlighting various Lockdown features on Windows Embedded Standard 8. In this first post Kevin Asgari gives us an overview of the Lockdown and Branding features found in Windows Embedded Standard 8. Kevin is a Writer for the Windows Embedded team and in his spare time enjoys reading, skiing, visiting wineries, and spending time with family.

    Windows Embedded Standard provides a building block version of the Windows operating system, enabling you to create a smaller, customized version of Windows by removing functionality that your device does not need. In addition, Windows Embedded Standard provides additional functionality for embedded devices that is not available in the full Windows OS. In Windows Embedded Standard 7 and earlier, we called these new features “embedded enabling features”, or EEFs for short.

    However, “embedded enabling features” is not a very descriptive term. In Windows Embedded Standard 8, we now call these features lockdown and branding features.

    Lockdown features enable you to provide a controlled device experience, mainly by limiting the ways in which an end user can interact with the device. For example, your device may be a dedicated cashier device that runs a full screen cashier application, and you may want to prevent users from being able to use Windows shortcut keys like Alt+Tab to switch out of the application, or Alt+4 to close the application.

    Branding features enable you to hide or change many of the parts of the OS that identify it as a Windows product. You may want the devices your company produces to show only your company’s branding to your customers for better brand recognition, or you may want to hide the underlying OS so that end users are less likely to try to break out of the tailored device experience.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
Page 58 of 83 (413 items) «5657585960»