Microsoft

bloggers

discussions

Intelligent Systems

Intelligent Systems

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Agility, Team work and Pragmatism

    Posted By Phillip Cave
    Software Development Engineer

    successThis week the extended developer (SDE) leadership team in Windows Embedded had a lively discussion around “agile” and how to foster a collaborative team effort. I followed up with the extended leadership team to help them understand some of the nuances of the transformation we are making.

    The discussion was kicked off asking how we may focus working as a unit to ship product. A misunderstanding arose about specialist vs. generalist team members, how to review contribution, and an overall misconception about being flexible in an agile environment. What follows was my response to the team.

    Yes, foster domain/technology specialists. Of course we should foster expertise around key areas of our product so that we may create technical leadership. Think of the system while doing so. Ensure we have redundant knowledge so that we do not constrain ourselves when delivering product.

    Yes we have an HR review model to evaluate team members. However, an HR review system or rather our interpretation of an HR review system should not dictate how we deliver product.

    Based on our discussion what I heard was that we are going to be evaluated based on the good things we deliver. This is as it should be. Our contribution to delivering product and the leadership on delivering product is all that matters.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    The Intern Perspective: Meg Quintero

    Posted By J.T. Kimbell
    Program Manager

    We continue our series of posts from Windows Embedded interns with the first of our 3 Explorer Interns that I had the privilege of coaching this summer. What’s an Explorer Intern? These interns don’t spend their whole summer in one of the three Software Development positions, but rather rotate between all of them, getting a taste for each. They’ll get the chance to come back next summer as a regular intern in the role of their choice. Below, Meg Quintero will tell you about her summer here in Seattle. To learn more about her project, check back next week for a post authored by all three Explorers.

    Introduction

    image
    Intern Signature Event at Gas Works Park

    Oh hai! My name is Meg, and I am one of the three Explorer interns on the Windows Embedded team. I am a rising junior at Harvard College concentrating in Computer Science and am contemplating a minor in Anthropology to further explore human interaction with technology. I am most recently from Havre, Montana, however, Cambridge has become more of my home. Back at Harvard, I am a soprano in the Harvard LowKeys, a contemporary co-ed a capella group, and have been singing for as long as I can remember. I enjoy biking, rollerblading, running, and pretty much anything that allows me to be outside. I am a big fan of the Red Sox and was able to attend a Red Sox vs. Mariners game and rep my team. I have been enjoying all that the Puget Sound area has to offer including incredible theater (“Rent”, “Les Miserables”, and “Turandot” were phenomenal), great shopping (Pike Place FTW), and waterfront a plenty. I also felt as if I died and went to heaven when I was handed a Samsung 9 Series Ultrabook at the Microsoft Intern Signature Event after hearing one of my favorite bands (Young The Giant) live at Gas Works Park.

    Read More...

    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Embedded Agility – Make All Work Visible – Part 2

    Posted By Phillip Cave
    Software Development Engineer

    Last time I presented the first part of this post. In this post I dive deeper into making work visible and discuss the pragmatic application of it.

    The introduction to this series on “Embedded Agility” summarized the transition and ongoing transformation of Windows Embedded to a delivery model based in Lean thinking. That first post outlined 3 basic tenets:

    1. Define small customer based experiences (user stories)
    2. Make all these experiences visible within the execution process in which they are delivered
    3. Manage the work in process of those experiences

    Now that we have our worked defined (infrastructure, discovery, implementation), our goal is to make it all visible.

    pic1There is an amazing psychology around visualizing and making our work tangible. I will go into small detail about how our senses (sight and touch) play a part in this. Suffice it to say when we make our work visible we tend to take on a different level of responsibility for it and our decision making is affected by it in a positive way.

    Our world is composed of “bits”. The experience we deliver to customers is the culmination of the assembly of a lot of bits. Our customers do not care about the bits, they care about the experience. Our customers do not care about our roles of who works on those bits; they care about getting the experience in a timely fashion. Our business relies on us to complete our bits quickly in order to realize the cash flow and tangible value associated with those bits.

    Read More...

    Comments Intelligent Systems

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Embedded Agility – Make All Work Visible – Part 1

    Posted By Phillip Cave
    Software Development Engineer

    Last month I provided an overview of Agile software development in Windows Embedded and set the table for some great follow-up posts. In this post I dive deeper into defining work and the value of making it visible.

    The introduction to this series on “Embedded Agility” summarized the transition and ongoing transformation of Windows Embedded to a delivery model based in Lean thinking. That first post outlined 3 basic tenets:

    1. Define small customer based experiences (user stories)
    2. Make all these experiences visible within the execution process in which they are delivered
    3. Manage the work in process of those experiences

    Last time I wrote on defining small customer experiences. This post discusses what to do with all those experiences we define. This is our “work” to do. Our ability to deliver on that work is greatly enhanced when we understand and see it.

    I am breaking this blog into two portions. I first need to describe the “work” we need to make visible. The second portion of this will discuss visibility and activities. Typically we only think of scenarios and user based stories. In software projects “work” may be defined within three areas:

    • Infrastructure – meta-work. (work about our work)
    • Discovery – work? (work about discovering our work)
    • Implementation – work! (do it) 

    Read More...

    Comments Intelligent Systems

    ...
  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Intelligent Systems in Health

    Posted By Garrett Clarke
    Senior Business Development and Strategy Manager

    As many of my colleagues have mentioned in their blogs over the past few months, we are seeing an increasing trend from autonomous devices toward ones that are truly connected and part of a much broader ecosystem. This shift in the embedded industry toward Intelligent Systems is further accelerated by the desire of enterprises to obtain a competitive advantage through increased knowledge about their customers and their business. It is truly an exciting time as the number of devices that are part of an Intelligent System is expected to nearly double by 2015 according to IDC. Clearly the application for Intelligent Systems spans many industries including Retail, Manufacturing, Auto, and Health. However, since I have spent the last 10 years (or so) working in healthcare, I wanted to share some of the thoughts I have on some usage scenarios of Intelligent Systems in health.


    Enabling the Connection to the Patient at Home:
    The impact that Intelligent Systems have on the healthcare has many similarities to that of other industries (i.e. reuse of data, cost reduction, timely access to information….) but it also has some distinct advantages. Most importantly, improved outcomes for patients. Many device manufacturers are now making devices that patients can use at home that will automatically connect the patient back to the provider or caregiver through the cloud. This streamlined integration increases the frequency that a provider or caregiver receives critical health metrics (blood pressure, blood glucose levels, weight, etc.). These “Connected Health” scenarios allows for greater collaboration across the provider, patient, and caregiver potentially allowing action to be taken prior to an acute event occurring.

    Read More...

    Comments Intelligent Systems

    ...
Page 19 of 20 (99 items) «1617181920