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Jeff Wettlaufer

Jeff Wettlaufer

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Developing intelligent, connected industry device solutions with Windows Embedded

    Posted By Jeff Wettlaufer
    Technical Program Manager

    Today at the Microsoft Build Developer’s Conference (//Build/) the Windows Embedded team reached the next milestone in our product roadmap by building on Windows Embedded 8 – the Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry Release Preview. This is a significant platform update to the Windows Embedded portfolio, furthering our engineering alignment and release schedule with Windows. We can’t wait for you to try it out.

    As many of you know, //Build/ is all about developing Windows solutions using the latest tools and platforms. The Windows Embedded team has had an amazing year, shipping Windows Embedded 8 Standard, Windows Embedded 8 Industry and Windows Embedded 8 Pro, as well as Windows Embedded Compact 2013. With the Windows Embedded 8 wave of releases, our portfolio extended alignment with the Microsoft tools you’re using today to develop apps for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 – platforms like Visual Studio, tools like XAML and Expression Blend, and frameworks like .NET that support rich, immersive, cloud-connected app experiences. When combined with a range of beautiful hardware, Windows solutions are better than they have ever been.

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    Comments Intelligent Systems

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Avis ‘Select and Go’: Empowering a mobile staff with agile technology solutions

    Posted By Jeff Wettlaufer
    Technical Program Manager

    Hello from //Build/! This week, the Windows Embedded team is in San Francisco with several thousand developers to talk about the Windows platform – this includes showcasing the opportunity to build rich, connected, immersive app experiences on industry-specific hardware using the latest Microsoft tools and technologies. We wanted to showcase for you some of the highlights that focus on Windows Embedded solutions, and dive into one of the demonstrations that was highlighted in Steve Guggenheimer’s keynote address: the Avis demonstration.

    With its strategic focus on mobility, Avis believes their staff needs to be as mobile and connected as their customers.  Many of you today are already using the Windows Phone 8 app provided from Avis to reserve, upgrade and manage your rental experience. It’s an awesome app, and I use it all the time. But that’s just the beginning…

    On the stage Guggenheimer showcased an HP Elitepad 900 tablet, running Windows Embedded 8 Industry and the Avis ‘Select and Go’ app.  This tablet was also using the recently announced HP Retail Jacket, which includes a mag stripe reader and bar code scanner. While not currently a device in use by Avis, its Atom processor, SSD, Gorilla glass, great battery life and support for industry-specific peripherals enable this device to be well-suited for a roaming retail employee. 

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    Comments Product Updates

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    How Intelligent Systems Streamline Data Landscapes in Healthcare

    Posted By Jeff Wettlaufer
    Technical Program Manager

    Hi everyone. With the exciting release of Windows Embedded 8, and the amazing application experiences that are associated with this new platform, we wanted to talk about how, from the sensor to the cloud, a consistent data stream and application experience can be shared across a number of form factors using a single development toolset.

    By optimizing our development, and helping you adopt using world-class development tools like Visual Studio, we enable organizations to standardize on one trusted platform, so you can develop cloud- connected services right down to embedded devices, and even the smallest of sensors like devices such as pulse oximeter sensors, used to record blood oxygen at family doctor offices.

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    Comments Intelligent Systems

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Intelligent Systems Defining New Retail Experiences

    Posted By Kevin Dallas
    General Manager

    There’s been a tremendous amount of change in the retail industry the last few years—much of it at the expense of brick-and-mortar retailers whose chief competitors play by a slightly different set of rules and business requirements. Together with some of our device partners and retail customers, we’re designing solutions to help the brick-and-mortar retailer regain its competitive edge. Technical Program Manager Jeff Wettlaufer helped design a solution with Motorola and The Home Depot, and it’s on display in New York this week at the National Retail Federation (NRF) Annual Convention & EXPO. Jeff is here today to provide some insight on how the solution can transform the shopping experience.   

    Hi everyone, we are here in New York to attend the 102nd NRF convention. Can you imagine what some of those first few events 90 to 100 years ago must have been like compared to today?

    This is my first NRF, and while not my first “event rodeo” this one is different from those TechEds and Microsoft Management Summits. This event is massive, with more than 35,000 attendees — all suited and booted leaders from the industry here to check out the latest advancements in retail. It’s going to be interesting, as major stakeholders are in attendance. The run-up to the event has been amazing. For the past 10 months, our Microsoft team has been driving some very cool things that we get to announce today. We thought a quick blog post about what we are showing would be interesting to you.

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    Comments Windows Embedded Standard

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Discovering Intelligent Systems at work in Manufacturing

    Posted By Jeff Wettlaufer
    Technical Program Manager

    Hey everyone, recently our Windows Embedded team was on a customer site visit in Europe, and we came across a fantastic example of Intelligent Systems in action. While we were touring an automobile manufacturing plant, we observed the line using electric screwdrivers like the one pictured below. They had two cables running into them. Power and Ethernet. We asked the tour director about the network cable, and they explained that the screwdriver was actually an ‘intelligent’ screwdriver.

    We smiled at the thought of this basic piece of hardware actually being able to think about what it was doing. Then he explained it and we were amazed. The screwdriver was hung off a manufacturing line Windows Embedded Compact PC that was connected to a larger network in the factory. The backend provided the screwdriver engineering specs about the screw going into that location on the car, including the required torque and even the number of revolutions that Class 1 screw should take to achieve the desired torque. So, when the technician popped the screw into the chassis, all they had to do was fire the trigger, and everything was automatic. They even had some scenarios where this was done using robotic arms instead of people.DSC_0914sm

    When the screw was installed in the car, a data point was generated that came back down the network cable and registered in the factory database. Basically, an ‘OK’, or ‘NOT OK’ was registered, and in the case of either the torque being missed, or that torque being achieved in an unexpected number of revolutions, a flag was popped to investigate further. In summary, the car would not get off the production line if the quality bar wasn’t met.

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    Intelligent Systems

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