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Windows Embedded Compact

Windows Embedded Compact

  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Understanding CEPC Boot Sequence in Windows Embedded Compact 7 – part 2

    Posted By David Campbell
    Program Manager

    Welcome back! This is part 2 of Doug Boling’s great write-up on Understanding CEPC Boot Sequence in Windows Embedded Compact 7. Last time we covered the PC boot sequence in detail. That provides the background for the Windows Embedded Compact specifics. Let’s jump right in...

    In Part 1, I started this discussion with an overview of two of the three different CEPC boot loaders provided in the Windows Embedded Compact 7. I discussed the LoadCEPC bootloader as well as how to use the BIOSLoader. I also talked about how the FAT file system. An understanding of the layout of a FAT storage device is important when understanding how these bootloaders work. In this installment, I will cover how the BIOSLoader and the WCELDR work and how to modify the WCELDR to adapt it to your hardware.

    How BIOSLoader Works

    In Part 1, I discussed how the file system works, now let’s return back to the BIOSLoader to cover how it works. When the system starts, the BIOS will load the Master Boot Records (MBR) into RAM which will find and load the boot sector of the active partition. This boot sector will be one of the BIOSLoader boot sectors that will have to be installed on the disk. The source code for the BIOSLoader boot sectors is located in \WINCE700\platform\cepc\src\bootloader\biosloader\bootsector, There is a unique boot sector for each of the different File Allocation Table (FAT) formats including ExFAT.

    The boot sector code finds the root directory and looks for the name BLDR with no extension. It expects to find this name in one of the first 32 entries in the root since the boot sector only reads the first sector of the root directory into memory.

    When the BLDR entry is found, the boot loader finds the location of the file data by using the first cluster entries in the directory entry for the file. Instead of following the FAT chain to properly load the entire file, the boot sector assumes that the file will be stored in linear sectors on the disk and reads a fixed (68 sectors or 34816 bytes) into memory at address 0:1000. This hard coded size provides an absolute limit on the size of the BLDR code.

    The boot sector then jumps to the first byte of the BLDR file. The BLDR then switches to protected mode and executes the remaining tasks from there. Those tasks include reading and parsing the BOOT.INI file and downloading or reading from the disk the NK.BIN file.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Leading the way with intelligent systems: Microsoft Partner Network introduces a new Intelligent Systems Competency

    Posted By Karen Roberts
    Senior Partner Marketing Manager

    At July’s 2013 Worldwide Partner Conference, the Windows Embedded team was excited to announce our plans to transition program administration of the Windows Embedded Partner Program ecosystem into the Microsoft Partner Network (MPN). Integrating with MPN enables us to offer our partners more program options, and greater partner benefits. Among these program options, we highlighted the launch of an all-new Intelligent Systems Specialization, designed for partners with an end-to-end intelligent-systems solution offering and business practice. This month, we are excited to announce new developments that will deliver more value than ever before to our intelligent systems partners: in January 2014, MPN will launch an all new Intelligent Systems Competency in place of the previously planned specialization.

    Leading up to and since the announcement the market has continued to see rapid growth as partners have picked up on the enormous business opportunity surrounding intelligent systems solutions. A 2013 IDC report estimates that by 2017, intelligent systems will represent over 87 percent of worldwide embedded systems revenue, which represents a market of more than $2.7 trillion.[1]

    Microsoft is committed to encouraging innovation and commitment among our intelligent systems partners, and want to provide them the highest possible level of support and resources they need to help them grow their business. Within the Microsoft Partner Network, the competency program—comprised of 23 unique competencies based on key Microsoft solution areas—offers the highest level of value to partners. A recent IDC study[2] estimates that a Microsoft competency program provides partners with total benefits valued at more than $320,000.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Optimizing Performance and Power in Windows Embedded Compact 7

    Posted By David Campbell
    Program Manager

    Doug Boling recently hosted one of his regular webcasts on Optimizing performance and power on Windows Embedded Compact 7 and has graciously provided me with a companion article. Thanks Doug! There’s more information later in the article about how you can sign up for these webcasts so please do join us for the monthly sessions.

    Embedded hardware is slow. It’s designed that way. Unlike Personal Computers which are sold to customers who are dazzled by high gigahertz numbers and massive hard disks, embedded customers buy a widget that does something. If the widget does something well that’s all that matters, so the manufacturer of that widget is going to use the slowest (and often least expensive) hardware possible to implement that widget. This is one requirement that makes embedded software so challenging to write. Embedded software must have great performance so that the hardware can be as inexpensive as possible.

    In this blog post, I will review some of the techniques for system design that can improve performance, and as a consequence, the power consumption of a system. I’ll also cover some lower level application driver characteristics that can lower power consumption directly.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Windows Embedded Compact 2013 update release is now generally available

    Posted By Partha Srinivasan
    Senior Product Manager

    We are pleased to announce that the update release to Windows Embedded Compact 2013 is now generally available. The release provides access to the new Visual Studio 2013, with an updated platform builder and application builder. There will be also a new inbox Wi-Fi driver for TI SDP44xx chipset.

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  • Windows Embedded Blog

    Now available: Wi-Fi drivers for Windows Embedded Compact 2013

    Posted By Partha Srinivasan
    Senior Product Manager

    Since we launched Windows Embedded Compact 2013, one of the key requests we’ve gotten has been around the availability of Wi-Fi drivers for the hardware platforms supported by the operating system. We have exciting news to share: One of our Windows Embedded Compact partners, embWise, recently announced the availability of a WLAN driver, and partner iWave Systems is in the process of making Wi-Fi drivers available soon.

     

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