Windows Core Networking

Windows Core Networking APIs and technologies such as Winsock, TCP/IP stack, WFP, IPsec, IPv6, WSK, WinINet, Http.sys, WinHttp, QoS, and System.Net

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  • Blog Post: QoS Traffic Generator Example Usage

    Update: This tool is no longer available on Microsoft Connect and there is no replacement download site. In my last post , I announced the availability of QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. In order to help you understand the usage of this tool, I have provided some examples of what it can...
  • Blog Post: QoS Traffic Generator is now available on Connect

    Update: This tool is no longer available on Microsoft Connect and there is no replacement download site. I’m posting on behalf of Jim Liu who is a SDET in Windows Core Networking. -- Ari The QoS team is pleased to announce the availability of the QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect...
  • Blog Post: QoS in Windows 7

    Hello all. My name is Charley. I’m the new QoS program manager for Windows Core Networking. It has been a while since we posted our last article about QoS. We want to assure you that we’re still committed to improving this technology and building new QoS features in Windows. We received many questions...
  • Blog Post: Throttling, DSCP, and 802.1p with Traffic Control

    In his introductory post about the legacy Traffic Control (TC) API , Gabe discussed the host-based model that TC provides. In this post, we will see how Traffic Control APIs can be used to achieve the following for TCP/IPv4 and UDP/IPv4 traffic sent from a host: Throttle (rate-limit) outgoing traffic...
  • Blog Post: Introduction to Windows QoS Traffic Control

    Disclaimer: Traffic Control (TC) APIs have been marked as deprecated , and will be phased out (eventually removed) when a suitable replacement API is available. No advancements will be made to these APIs (including adding IPv6 support) in their deprecated state; however, application compatibility will...
  • Blog Post: WiFi WMM Requirements for Vista Miniport Drivers

    A number of partners who author wireless drivers for Vista have asked how they can ensure their WiFi Wireless Multimedia (WMM) implementation is correct, so I thought I'd be explicit about this very important topic. To begin, read the 4-part series WiFi QoS Support in Windows Vista , which describes...
  • Blog Post: Detecting 802.1p Priority Tags: Part 3

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series discussed how to determine whether an 802.1p tag was added to traffic, and how to modify the NDIS light-weight-filter (LWF) sample driver source code to accomplish this task. We do know that you're all very busy and not everyone is a developer, so we've added to the package...
  • Blog Post: Detecting 802.1p Priority Tags: Part 2

    In Gabe’s last post on detecting 802.1p priority tags, he described at a relatively high-level why it is difficult to detect a priority tag using packet tracing applications, as well as the proper way to determine whether a tag was present in a packet that was sent onto the wire (or air). In this post...
  • Blog Post: Detecting 802.1p Priority Tags

    Consider a case where a network application calls Windows QoS APIs to add a layer-2 IEEE 802.1Q UserPriority tag (almost always referred to as 802.1p ) to outgoing traffic. Ascertaining whether the tag actually got added to an outgoing packet is not as simple as it seems due to the nature of how the...
  • Blog Post: Windows Rally Demo'd at WinHEC

    I noticed that there was a demo of Rally technologies at the WinHEC keynote the other day, so I created a link to part of the keynote with the Rally demo . Enjoy. -- Ari Pernick
  • Blog Post: The Importance of 5GHz Operation for Video

    Recently, I read a great article on ZDNet that discusses the challenges IEEE 802.11n faces with 2.4GHz operation. The article is appropriately titled The Consequences of Abandoning the 5GHz Frontier , and discusses some history, backward compatibility, and interference. The important takeaway from this...
  • Blog Post: Wireless Routers That Rock: First Works With Vista Router

    Congratulations to D-Link (powered by Ubicom ) for being the first ever to acheive a Windows Vista logo for the DIR-655 wireless router. While Buffalo acheived the premium "Certified for Windows Vista" logo , D-Link was first to meet the baseline "Works with Windows Vista" requirements (months ago)....
  • Blog Post: Wireless Routers That Rock: First Certified For Vista Router

    Congratulations to Buffalo for being the first to acheive a Certified for Windows Vista logo for their dual-band WZR-AG300NH wireless router. In short, this device passed over eight hours worth of rigerous testing designed to ensure a fantastic experience of Windows Vista scenarios; including HD...
  • Blog Post: QoS Support in Windows

    A few months ago, a technical account manager for a customer sent an email to everyone in Windows networking asking about QoS support in Windows. When answering the question, I realized that there was no single document or web page that outlined the level of support and what resources are available for...
  • Blog Post: Windows Vista Networking Goodies, Part 2: Device & Service Discovery

    In my first post of this series, I talked about Windows Connect Now (WCN) and how easy it is in Windows Vista to discover, configure, and securely connect devices to a wireless network. In this post, I’ll talk about how to discover PCs, devices, and services that are available on the network. In Windows...
  • Blog Post: Windows Vista Networking Goodies, Part 1: Windows Connect Now

    In addition to a completely re-written core networking stack, Windows Vista makes networking a significantly easier proposition for home, small business, and enterprise users. In this multi-part series, I’ll describe some new features which greatly simplify the experience of connecting to and configuring...
  • Blog Post: LLTD is Available for Non-Windows Platforms

    Exciting news; the Windows Rally Development Kit was publicly released today on the Windows Rally technologies website! This porting kit is royalty free and provides full source code for an embedded Linux (yes, you read that correctly) reference implementation. Although Linux was used as a reference...
  • Blog Post: How to Enable the Windows Vista Network Map

    As Gabe mentioned in his blog post titled “ Xbox 360 Fall Update Includes LLTD ,” the Xbox 360 now includes the Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) protocol. At a basic function level, LLTD gives users a graphical representation of their home network topology. In addition to the network map, LLTD offers...
  • Blog Post: Xbox 360 Fall Update Includes LLTD

    There has been a lot of buzz about the recent fall update for the Xbox 360; however, an important new feature which has not been mentioned is support for the Link Layer Topology Discovery ( LLTD ) protocol. In its basic form, LLTD allows a Windows Vista PC to accurately map the topology of your home...
  • Blog Post: A new central location for all things QoS in Windows

    We have a new TechNet site for Windows networking QoS: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/itsolutions/network/qos/default.mspx . Check it out and let me know if you still have unanswered QoS questions. We are always looking for ways to improve our communication and transparency. ::Gabe
  • Blog Post: How to find consumer network gear that rocks: part 2 (QoS)

    The “Certified for Windows Vista” logo is comprised of requirements for myriad networking features and scenarios, one of which being network Quality of Service (QoS). What is QoS and why is it important you ask? QoS is an overloaded term, but in short, it is a capability which enables priority handling...
  • Blog Post: How to find consumer network gear that rocks

    Over the past few years, we've seen consumer networking products get really cheap. While cheap in a currency sense is great, we're unfortunately left experiencing the same of product quality (usually while grimacing at the "getting started" manual). Consumer networking gear has been on a race to the...
  • Blog Post: WiFi QoS Support in Windows Vista: WMM Part 4

    Parts 1-3 of this series on WMM provided a bunch of details about how the Windows Vista network stack enables prioritization on WiFi networks, and how to figure out if the access point actually supports this capability. This post describes what behavior you can expect on a WMM capable wireless network...
  • Blog Post: WiFi QoS Support in Windows Vista: WMM Part 3

    In my previous posts about WMM support in Vista, I described how Windows network applications can indicate which priority level they desire for traffic sent, and how Native WiFi (NWF) drivers can identify this traffic to provide appropriate prioritization over the shared wireless segment. It’s important;...
  • Blog Post: Shaping outgoing traffic - Part 1

    Last week I added QOS2 calls to a sample Winsock application to obtain DSCP marking. The second request we get from developers is to shape their outgoing traffic, i.e. limit the rate at which their traffic is sent. With Vista you configure this on your QOS2 flow using the QOSSetFlow function. The API...
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