Windows Core Networking

Windows Core Networking APIs and technologies such as Winsock, TCP/IP stack, WFP, IPsec, IPv6, WSK, WinINet, Http.sys, WinHttp, QoS, and System.Net

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  • Blog Post: Winsock SO_EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE on Vista

    I've been asked a couple times about the socket option SO_EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE on Vista and especially how it relates to dual stack sockets. The following doc link describes the basic idea of this socket option: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms740621.aspx However, it hasn't been updated...
  • Blog Post: Winsock Header Weirdness

    There are two main Winsock headers used depending on which version your application needs. There is winsock.h for Winsock v1.x and winsock2.h for Winsock v2.x and they are mutually exclusive. That is, if you include both header files you will see a lot of compilation errors. As you may know, windows...
  • Blog Post: Our Mike Flasko and Anthony Jones on Channel 9

    There is a new video up on channel9 talking about Coding to support IPv6. Go check it out! -- Ari Pernick
  • Blog Post: LSP Installation Problems with WSCInstallProvider64_32

    An LSP (or Winsock provider) can be installed into the Winsock catalog through several different function calls. Also, as you might know, on 64-bit Windows there are two different Winsock catalogs – one for 32-bit applications and one for 64-bit native applications. In order for an LSP to be loaded by...
  • Blog Post: WSAPoll, A new Winsock API to simplify porting poll() applications to Winsock.

    Hello, my name is Chad Carlin. I'm a software developer on the Winsock Test Team. Among the many improvements to the Winsock API shipping in Vista is the new WSAPoll function. Its primary purpose is to simplify the porting of a sockets application that currently uses poll() by providing an identical...
  • Blog Post: Creating IP Agnostic Applications - Part 2 (Dual Mode Sockets)

    In a previous post I wrote about how on Windows Vista and Windows Server "Longhorn," IPv6 is installed and enabled by default and that when both IPv4 and IPv6 are enabled, the TCP/IP stack prefers to use IPv6 over IPv4. With the growth of IPv6, applications must now work seamlessly over both protocols...
  • Blog Post: Debugging Winsock LSPs

    Several people have asked for tips on debugging LSPs, and unfortunately there’s no easy method to do so. One difficulty with LSPs is that once it’s installed any number of processes can immediately load the faulty LSP and begin to behave badly. This usually isn’t fatal unless one of those processes happens...
  • Blog Post: Creating IP Agnostic Applications - Part 1

    In Windows Vista and Windows Server "Longhorn," IPv6 is installed and enabled by default. When both IPv4 and IPv6 are enabled on these OSs, the TCP/IP stack prefers to use IPv6 over IPv4. For example, APIs such as ConnectByName will attempt to connect first via IPv6. See this post for a detailed discussion...
  • Blog Post: WSAConnectByName() and WSAConnectByList()

    G’Day, my name is Brad Williamson, a Software Design Engineer with the Windows Networking Developer Platform (WNDP) group here at Microsoft. I am going to talk about two APIs that were introduced in Windows Vista Beta 2 to simplify the process of connecting to another connection-oriented socket application...
  • Blog Post: The (new) Trouble with select and LSPs...

    If you’ve ever had to deal with Winsock LSPs, then you probably know that handling select function calls are rather convoluted – especially with certain apps that pass multiple socket types into select. Some applications (like IE) will pass a UDP/IPv4 and a TCP/IPv4 socket in a single select call. This...
  • Blog Post: WNDP Connect Site gets an upgrade!

    Last year we setup a small site on connect.microsoft.com in order to let our blog readers, developers and users file bugs, make suggestions and get some conntent like whitepapers and samples early. The downside to the site was that you couldn't easily deep link and it required a Windows Live (aka Passport...
  • Blog Post: Winsock and the new SDK Headers

    As you may have noticed in the recent Vista CTP SDK, the Winsock headers have undergone some changes. First, instead of a couple monolithic files (winsock2.h and mswsock.h), they have been split into a number of smaller files for ease of maintenance as well as for use by other components that don't necessarily...
  • Blog Post: Introduction to Winsock Kernel (WSK)

    Overview of WSK In Windows Vista a new transport-independent kernel mode Network Programming Interface (NPI) called Winsock Kernel (WSK) has been added. Using WSK, kernel-mode software modules can perform network communication using socket-like programming semantics similar to those supported in...
  • Blog Post: Winsock and Vista User Account Control

    As you might have heard, Vista introduces User Account Control (UAC) which is a security feature that enables users to perform some tasks as non-Administrators. This has an effect on LSP writers as the Winsock functions to install and remove LSP entries can only be called as an Administrator. On Vista...
  • Blog Post: Categorizing LSPs and Applications

    In Windows Vista there is a new method for categorizing both Winsock Layered Service Providers (LSP) and applications themselves such that only certain LSPs will be loaded. There are a couple reasons for adding this functionality. One of the main reasons is certain system critical processes such as WinLogon...
  • Blog Post: Dual Stack Sockets on Windows Vista

    One of the changes in Windows Vista is that the IPv4 and IPv6 stacks are integrated -- on older OSes they were completely separate stacks. One benefit of this tighter coupling is the ability to create dual-mode sockets. That is, an application can create a single TCP (or UDP) socket and receive both...
  • Blog Post: Winsock Connect and TCP SYN Attack Protection

    TCP SYN attack protection has been available on Windows platforms since Windows 2000, but by default is turned off. This has changed for the Windows 2003 SP1 release as SP1 enables SYN attack protection by default (which is a good thing). However, once enabled it affects how TCP connections are accepted...
  • Blog Post: Winsock - Microsoft Connect Program

    In an earlier blog ( http://blogs.msdn.com/wndp/archive/2005/09/27/474679.aspx ), Shivakumar introduced the Connect program. Shiva mentioned WinInet, WinHTTP and HTTP.sys are using Microsoft Connect. This blog is to announce Winsock has now joined Connect. This means you can submit bugs, submit feature...
  • Blog Post: Changes in Socket Bind

    MSDN finally has the "Using SO_REUSEADDR and SO_EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE" doc online. I previously posted it on this blog but the formatting came out a bit funky. Here's the link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/winsock/winsock/using_so_reuseaddr_and_so_exclusiveaddruse.asp...
  • Blog Post: Socket Security: Using SO_REUSEADDR and SO_EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE

    Developing secure applications is a priority for most developers today; however, socket security is often overlooked but is especially critical. Socket security deals with other processes binding to the same port that an existing application already has a socket bound to. In the past, any process could...
  • Blog Post: MSDN Magazine on Winsock/System.Net

    MSDN Magazine for August 2005 has an article about System.Net.Sockets and WinSock by Daryn Kiely: Sockets are the transport mechanism most frequently used in high-performance server applications. Fortunately, the Win32 ® Windows ® Sockets library (Winsock) provides mechanisms to improve...
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