• Wriju's BLOG

    Windows Azure Table Storage

    • 0 Comments

    Windows Azure Table has changed quite a bit since SDK 1.x. So there are buch of new approaches and ways to handle them

    First we need to install WindowsAzure.Storage from http://nuget.org

    image

    Now have the entity

    public class Employee : TableEntity
    {
    public Employee()
    {
    this.PartitionKey = "emp";
    this.RowKey = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }
    public string FullName { get; set; }
    }

    Then a simple ASP.NET page which has textbox, button and a grid would look like

    public partial class _Default : Page
    {
    //Sample Connection String

    CloudStorageAccount csa =
    CloudStorageAccount.Parse(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DataConnection"].ConnectionString);
    string tableName = "employee";
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    if(!Page.IsPostBack)
    {
    //ShowData();
    }
    }

    private void SaveData()
    {
    CloudTableClient tableClient = csa.CreateCloudTableClient();

    CloudTable table = tableClient.GetTableReference(tableName);
    table.CreateIfNotExists();

    Employee empData = new Employee() { FullName = txtName.Text };

    TableOperation insertOps = TableOperation.Insert(empData);

    table.Execute(insertOps);
    }

    private void ShowData()
    {
    CloudTableClient tableClient = csa.CreateCloudTableClient();

    CloudTable table = tableClient.GetTableReference(tableName);
    table.CreateIfNotExists();

    TableQuery<Employee> query = new TableQuery<Employee>().Where(
    TableQuery.GenerateFilterCondition("PartitionKey", QueryComparisons.Equal, "emp"));

    var allEmps = table.ExecuteQuery(query);

    grdEmployee.DataSource = allEmps;
    grdEmployee.DataBind();
    }

    protected void btnSave_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    SaveData();
    ShowData();
    }
    }

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Goodbye Cassini and FrontPage Extension

    • 0 Comments

    Visual Studio 2013 does not support Cassini Web Server and FronPage Extension any more Sad smile

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 Planning series of short webcasts

    • 0 Comments

    Hello all,

    I want to talk about various new features of Visual Studio 2013 and Team Foundation Server 2013. I will start small. Let’s say 30 min per talk so that you do not have to spend a lot of time. Also we can connect offline. I would do using Live Meeting.

    Please let me know your topics you want me to focus on Podcast. The first one is planned

    Visual Studio 2013 IDE Enhancements

    Just post your comments here and I will be reading them.

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 Learn New things

    • 0 Comments

    TechEd

    clip_image001 clip_image002 clip_image003 clip_image004 clip_image005

    //Build Sessions

    clip_image006

    clip_image007

    clip_image008

    clip_image009

    clip_image010

    clip_image011

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Team Foundation Server 2013 : Books Free and Paid

    • 2 Comments

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Team Foundation Server 2013 : Learning Videos

    • 0 Comments

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Team Foundation Server 2013 : Git Integration

    • 0 Comments

    TFS 2013 now supports Git natively.

    image

    image

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Team Foundation Server 2013 : Scheduling Backup & Restore

    • 0 Comments

    Team Foundation Server 2013 now comes with scheduling backups. Backups are as important as any running system. You never know when bad things may come especially with live environments. 

    image

    image

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    Now you can simply restore database through the same wizard

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : New enhanced scroll bar #7

    • 0 Comments

    You will not imagine unless you play with this feature. Scrollbar was never a charm like this

    image

    After you do this your scrollbar would look like

    image

    Also you may see the code preview in a popup

    image

    Alternatively you can get them when you right click to a scroll bar

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : CodeLens (Code Information Indicators) #6

    • 0 Comments

    As a developer one needs to identify who worked on a specific code. CodeLens enables not only history but also something like Unit Test etc. You can directly run Unit testing from here

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Tools Options has search #5

    • 0 Comments

    Now in Visual Studio 2013 Tools > Options you can search things. WOW

    image

    Namokar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Give a quick feedback #4

    • 0 Comments

    While you are working with Visual Studio you are supposed to fall in love with it. Appreciate the good work the team has done right from Visual Studio. You will get it in Visual Studio 2013’s top right corner

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Enhanced “Go to Definition” #3

    • 0 Comments

    F12 or Go to Definition is one of the most used features for developers. It was there in Visual Studio 2013 since very long. Now you can either select Alt+F12 or select “Peek Definition

    image

    After you select it

    image

    You go on and on. After sometime you will find a blue breadcrumb

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Update Notification #2

    • 0 Comments

    Unlike previous version of Visual Studio update notifications this is now part of the IDE. You will find them on your Visual Studio 2013 IDE’s top right corner, just before the Quick Launch search.

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Visual Studio 2013 : Roaming Profile #1

    • 0 Comments

    This is one another cool feature Visual Studio 2013 introduced. So you need to login on top right corner of the Visual Studio 2013 IDE.

    image

    This will carry setting across machines.

    What are the settings it will carry? You will find the setting in Tools > Options

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Build Windows Phone Apps using Windows Azure Mobile Services from Ground Up

    • 2 Comments

    Windows Phone 8 works really well with Window Azure Mobile Services. Windows Azure portal gives us the startup apps, however you can also build from ground up. Here it is,

    Let’s say you have created a Windows Azure Mobile Service

    image

    image

    Once it is ready

    image

    Grab the URL and Key. After that create a blank Windows Phone 8 Apps.

    image

    Then add the Windows Azure Mobile Services from http://nuget.org. Run the below command in Library Package Manager Console 

    image

    This will install these below assemblies

    image

    After that in App.xaml.cs add this line

     

    public static MobileServiceClient MobileService = 
    
        new MobileServiceClient("https://wpmobile.azure-mobile.net/", "jjj.....");

    Create a blank table in Windows Azure Mobile Services called “Employee

    image

    image

    Then add the entity called “Employee”

    //The Model Class
    
    public class Employee
    
    {
    
        public int Id { get; set; }
    
        public string FullName { get; set; }
    
    }

    To add a new Employee

    private void SaveData(Employee emp)
    
    {
    
        App.MobileService.GetTable<Employee>().InsertAsync(emp);
    
    }

    This will add a new column called FullName because the dynamic schema is ON by default.

    Similarly we can read the data

    var emps = await App.MobileService.GetTable<Employee>().ReadAsync();

    This clearly a simple approach. Adding the XAML and complete C# to run the code

    XAML

    <!--ContentPanel - place additional content here-->
    
    <Grid x:Name="ContentPanel" Grid.Row="1" Margin="12,0,12,0">
    
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
    
            <RowDefinition Height="*"></RowDefinition>
    
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"></RowDefinition>
    
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    
        <StackPanel Grid.Row="0">
    
            <TextBox x:Name="txtName"></TextBox>
    
            <Button x:Name="btnSave" Content="Save" Click="btnSave_Click"></Button>
    
            <Button x:Name="btnLoad" Content="Load Data" Click="btnLoad_Click"></Button>
    
        </StackPanel>
    
                
    
        <ListBox x:Name="lstData" Grid.Row="1" VerticalAlignment="Top">
    
            <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    
                <DataTemplate>
    
                    <TextBlock FontSize="30" Text="{Binding Path=FullName}"></TextBlock>
    
                </DataTemplate>
    
            </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    
        </ListBox>
    
    </Grid>

    Complete C#

    //The Model Class
    
    public class Employee
    
    {
    
        public int Id { get; set; }
    
        public string FullName { get; set; }
    
    }
    
    public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
    
    {
    
        public MainPage()
    
        {
    
            InitializeComponent();
    
        }
    
        private void btnSave_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    
        {
    
            Employee emp = new Employee() { FullName = txtName.Text };
    
            SaveData(emp);
    
            ShowData();
    
        }
    
        //Add data
    
        private void SaveData(Employee emp)
    
        {
    
            App.MobileService.GetTable<Employee>().InsertAsync(emp);
    
        }
    
        private void btnLoad_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    
        {
    
            ShowData();
    
        }
    
        //Read the data
    
        private async void ShowData()
    
        {
    
            var emps = await App.MobileService.GetTable<Employee>().ReadAsync();
    
            lstData.ItemsSource = emps;
    
        }        
    
    }

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Repository Pattern with ADO.NET Entity Framework Hack

    • 4 Comments

    Let’s build ADO.NET Entity Framework library using Repository Pattern. There are a many ways but this is probably the easiest hack. 

    First build a blank solution

    image

    Then add a class library called “DAL” and add a class called “Employee”

    namespace DAL
    
    {
    
        public class Employee
    
        {
    
            public int Id { get; set; }
    
            public string FullName { get; set; }
    
        }
    
    }
    Then in the DAL add “EntityFramework” from http://nuget.org in Package Manager Console

    image

    At Package manager Console it would show

    image

    Then add T4Scaffolding from http://nuget.org in Package Manager Console

    image
    The Package Manager Console would look like

    image

    Project structure will be as below

    image

    Notice that in the reference section the Entity Framework is showing but the “T4Scaffolding” is missing. However the packages.config shows the list.

    This is as template so you will find them at the source folder

    image

    Run the following command from the DAL project’s Package Manager Console

    PM> scaffold repository DAL.Employee -DbContextType:HRContext

    Output would show

    image

    This would create two files under DAL > Models as “EmployeeReopository.cs” and “HRContext.cs

    image

    The content would look like

    HRContext.cs

    namespace DAL.Models
    
    {
    
        public class HRContext : DbContext
    
        {
    
            // You can add custom code to this file. Changes will not be overwritten.
    
            // 
    
            // If you want Entity Framework to drop and regenerate your database
    
            // automatically whenever you change your model schema, add the following
    
            // code to the Application_Start method in your Global.asax file.
    
            // Note: this will destroy and re-create your database with every model change.
    
            // 
    
            // System.Data.Entity.Database.SetInitializer(new System.Data.Entity.DropCreateDatabaseIfModelChanges<DAL.Models.HRContext>());
    
            public DbSet<DAL.Employee> Employees { get; set; }
    
        }
    
    }

    EmployeeRepository.cs

    using System;
    
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    
    using System.Data;
    
    using System.Data.Entity;
    
    using System.Linq;
    
    using System.Linq.Expressions;
    
    using System.Web;
    
    using DAL;
    
    namespace DAL.Models
    
    { 
    
        public class EmployeeRepository : IEmployeeRepository
    
        {
    
            HRContext context = new HRContext();
    
            public IQueryable<Employee> All
    
            {
    
                get { return context.Employees; }
    
            }
    
            public IQueryable<Employee> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Employee, object>>[] includeProperties)
    
            {
    
                IQueryable<Employee> query = context.Employees;
    
                foreach (var includeProperty in includeProperties) {
    
                    query = query.Include(includeProperty);
    
                }
    
                return query;
    
            }
    
            public Employee Find(int id)
    
            {
    
                return context.Employees.Find(id);
    
            }
    
            public void InsertOrUpdate(Employee employee)
    
            {
    
                if (employee.Id == default(int)) {
    
                    // New entity
    
                    context.Employees.Add(employee);
    
                } else {
    
                    // Existing entity
    
                    context.Entry(employee).State = EntityState.Modified;
    
                }
    
            }
    
            public void Delete(int id)
    
            {
    
                var employee = context.Employees.Find(id);
    
                context.Employees.Remove(employee);
    
            }
    
            public void Save()
    
            {
    
                context.SaveChanges();
    
            }
    
            public void Dispose() 
    
            {
    
                context.Dispose();
    
            }
    
        }
    
        public interface IEmployeeRepository : IDisposable
    
        {
    
            IQueryable<Employee> All { get; }
    
            IQueryable<Employee> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Employee, object>>[] includeProperties);
    
            Employee Find(int id);
    
            void InsertOrUpdate(Employee employee);
    
            void Delete(int id);
    
            void Save();
    
        }
    
    }

    You are simply done. You need a project and add DAL as reference then …

    namespace ConsoleApplication1
    
    {
    
        class Program
    
        {
    
            static void Main(string[] args)
    
            {
    
                InsertEmployee();
    
            }
    
            private static void InsertEmployee()
    
            {
    
                using (var repo = new EmployeeRepository())
    
                {
    
                    Employee em = new Employee() { FullName = "Wriju" };
    
                    repo.InsertOrUpdate(em);
    
                    repo.Save();
    
                }
    
            }
    
        }
    
    }

    No EntityFramework reference or so.

    image

    Isn’t it easy? Enjoy!!!

    Special thanks to Julie Lerman, if you don’t know who she is then you are not an Entity Framework developer.

     

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    The beautiful MVVM

    • 0 Comments

    Getting Started with MVVM in 10 minutes

     

    Building a Reusable ICommand implementation for Windows Phone MVVM apps

     

    Laurent Bugnion, leads the MVVM Light Toolkit project, has a 4-article MSDN series on MVVM

    IOC Containers and MVVM

    Messenger and View Services in MVVM

    Maximizing the Visual Designer's Usage with Design-Time Data

    Commands, RelayCommands and EventToCommand

     

    And finally, more videos:

    Designing Awesome XAML apps for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 (Build 2012)

    Create Cross-Platform Apps using Portable Class Libraries (Build 2012)

    Understanding the Model-View-ViewModel pattern (MIX10)

    Deep Dive MVVM (MIX 11)

    Namoskar!!!

     

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Reinstall Windows Phone Application

    • 1 Comments

    When your phone gets reset or you have a new Windows Phone you might want to get back the old apps you had downloaded in past. Here it is as easy as candy.

    1. Go to http://www.windowsphone.com/

    2. Login using the same Microsoft Account which you are using in the Windows Phone

    3. You need to enable “Find my Phone” from Settings.

    4. Then go to “Purchase Historyhttps://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/my/purchase-history

    This would show you the list of Applications you had installed earlier. You can simply click on reinstall and it will push them to your phone

    image

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    ADO.NET Entity Framework : Executing TSQL and DbContext under same Transaction

    • 0 Comments

    There might be a requirement that we need to run a RAW SQL statement and DbContext update under same connection and would like to have the Transaction in place. Let’s see how we can achieve this easily

    SQL Table

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Emp](
    
    	[Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    
    	[FirstName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    
    	[LastName] [varchar](50) NULL,
    
     CONSTRAINT [PK_Emp] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    
    (
    
    	[Id] ASC
    
    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
    
    ) ON [PRIMARY]
    

    C# Code

    private static void TransactionSample()
    
    {
    
        int id = 2299;
    
        var trOptions = new TransactionOptions() { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted };
    
        using (var tran = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, trOptions))
    
        {
    
            using (var ctx = new TestDBEntities())
    
            {
    
                try
    
                {
    
                    ctx.Database.Connection.Open();
    
                    var sqlCommand = ctx.Database.Connection.CreateCommand();
    
                    //TODO: You may add some just char to produce bad query
    
                    sqlCommand.CommandText = "UPDATE Emp SET FirstName ='FirstName1' WHERE Id=" + id.ToString();
    
                    sqlCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    
                    //TODO: you may add some wrong id so that it will fail
    
                    var empUpdate = ctx.Emps.Where(p => p.Id == id).First();
    
                    empUpdate.LastName = "LastName1";
    
                    ctx.SaveChanges();
    
                            
    
                    tran.Complete();
    
                }
    
                catch
    
                {
    
                    Console.WriteLine("Some error occured");
    
                    //Fail the Transaction
    
                }
    
            }
    
        }
    

    }

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Windows Azure Mobile Services : Adding and Filtering Authenticated User in Table

    • 0 Comments

    When you authenticate you Mobile apps using Windows Azure Mobile Services you may want to add the user id in your table row. This way you can later filter them while reading. This sandbox filing would give a portal experience to the end user. Now this can be done at the client level but the “Server Script” is the most elegant way to do it because it can hide the code from user to do injection.

    During insert you may write

    image

     

    While reading you also need to filter out.

    image

    So your table level data security is implemented.

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Office 365 is free for NGO

    • 0 Comments

    It’s a channel and to know more about it visit http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/Press/2013/Sep13/09-10Office365NonprofitsPR.aspx

    Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday announced the global availability of Office 365 for Nonprofits for qualifying nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) through its software donation program. The donation is available immediately in 41 countries around the world and for up to 90 countries by July 2014…..

    Namoskar!!!

  • Wriju's BLOG

    Using Repository Pattern in Entity Framework

    • 7 Comments

    One of the most common pattern is followed in the world of Entity Framework is “Repository Pattern”. Since this is something which is heavily used and being practiced, I am not going to talk about the core pattern. Rather, try to show how one can implement it.

    Objectives

    As mentioned in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff649690.aspx

    • You want to maximize the amount of code that can be tested with automation and to isolate the data layer to support unit testing.
    • You access the data source from many locations and want to apply centrally managed, consistent access rules and logic.
    • You want to implement and centralize a caching strategy for the data source.
    • You want to improve the code's maintainability and readability by separating business logic from data or service access logic.
    • You want to use business entities that are strongly typed so that you can identify problems at compile time instead of at run time.
    • You want to associate a behavior with the related data. For example, you want to calculate fields or enforce complex relationships or business rules between the data elements within an entity.
    • You want to apply a domain model to simplify complex business logic.

    Simple approach to ADO.NET Entity Framework

    Let’s have one domain class called “Employee”

    public class Employee
    
    {
    
        public int Id { get; set; }
    
        public string FullName { get; set; }
    
    }
    Now using this we will have a simple context class
    public class HRContext : DbContext
    
    {        
    
        public DbSet<DomainClasses.Employee> Employees { get; set; }
    
    }
    After that, define the repository interface IEmployeeRepository
    public interface IEmployeeRepository : IDisposable
    
    {
    
        IQueryable<Employee> All { get; }
    
        IQueryable<Employee> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Employee, object>>[] includeProperties);
    
        Employee Find(int id);
    
        void InsertOrUpdate(Employee employee);
    
        void Delete(int id);
    
        void Save();
    
    }
    Then the Repository class called EmployeeRepository
    public class EmployeeRepository : IEmployeeRepository
    
    {
    
        HRContext context = new HRContext();
    
        public IQueryable<Employee> All
    
        {
    
            get { return context.Employees; }
    
        }
    
        public IQueryable<Employee> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Employee, object>>[] includeProperties)
    
        {
    
            IQueryable<Employee> query = context.Employees;
    
            foreach (var includeProperty in includeProperties) {
    
                query = query.Include(includeProperty);
    
            }
    
            return query;
    
        }
    
        public Employee Find(int id)
    
        {
    
            return context.Employees.Find(id);
    
        }
    
        public void InsertOrUpdate(Employee employee)
    
        {
    
            if (employee.Id == default(int)) {
    
                // New entity
    
                context.Employees.Add(employee);
    
            } else {
    
                // Existing entity
    
                context.Entry(employee).State = EntityState.Modified;
    
            }
    
        }
    
        public void Delete(int id)
    
        {
    
            var employee = context.Employees.Find(id);
    
            context.Employees.Remove(employee);
    
        }
    
        public void Save()
    
        {
    
            context.SaveChanges();
    
        }
    
        public void Dispose() 
    
        {
    
            context.Dispose();
    
        }
    
    }
    Then you should be implementing it in your apps (any type Windows or Web), like a Console Application
    namespace ConsoleApplication
    
    {
    
        class Program
    
        {
    
            static void Main(string[] args)
    
            {
    
                GetSomeEmployee();
    
            }
    
            private static void IntiateData()
    
            {
    
                using (var repo = new EmployeeRepository())
    
                {
    
                    Employee em = new Employee() { FullName = "Wriju" };
    
                    repo.InsertOrUpdate(em);
    
                    repo.Save();
    
                }
    
            }
    
            private static void GetSomeEmployee()
    
            {
    
                using (var repo = new EmployeeRepository()) 
    
                {
    
                    foreach (var emp in repo.All)
    
                    {
    
                        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", emp.Id, emp.FullName);
    
                    }
    
                }            
    
            }
    
        }
    
    }
    This obviously simple approach. The recommended options are to make the Repository generic and handle the related entities. I will discuss about them later.
    Namoskar!!!
  • Wriju's BLOG

    Patterns and Practices : Dependency Injection with Unity–Just Released

    • 1 Comments

    Just Released!!!

    Patterns and Practices guidance on Dependency Injection with Unity

    clip_image001[4] 

     

    PDF

     

    EPUB

     

    MOBI

     

    HARD COPY

     

    Inside the guide:

    Foreword by Chris Tavares

    Chapter 1 – Introduction

    Chapter 2 – Dependency Injection

    Chapter 3 – Dependency Injection with Unity

    Chapter 4 – Interception

    Chapter 5 – Interception using Unity

    Chapter 6 – Extending Unity

    Tales from the Trenches: Using Unity

    Tales from the Trenches: One User's Story – Customizing Unity

    Tales from the Trenches: Using Unity in a Windows Store app

    Appendix  – Unity and Windows Store apps

     

     

     

    The guide is a primer on using dependency injection with Unity – a lightweight extensible dependency injection container built by the Microsoft patterns & practices team. It covers various styles of dependency injection and also additional capabilities of Unity container, such as object lifetime management, interception, and registration by convention. It also discusses the advanced topics of enhancing Unity with your custom extensions.

     

    The guide contains plenty of trade-off discussions and tips and tricks for managing your application cross-cutting concerns and making the most out of both dependency injection and Unity. These are accompanied by a real world example that will help you master the techniques. Keep in mind that Unity can be used in a wide range of application types such as desktop, web, services, and cloud.

     

    We encourage you to experiment with the sample code and think beyond the scenarios discussed in the guide.

    In addition, the guide includes the Tales from the Trenches – a collection of case studies that offer a different perspective through the eyes of developers working on the real world projects and sharing their experiences. These chapters make clear the range of scenarios in which you can use Unity, and also highlight its ease of use and flexibility.

     

    Whether you are a seasoned developer or just starting your development journey, we hope this guide will be worth your time studying it. We hope you discover that Unity container adds significant benefits to your applications and helps you to achieve the goals of maintainability, testability, flexibility, and extensibility in your own projects.

     

    Namoskar!!!
  • Wriju's BLOG

    Microsoft Patterns and Practices Guidance on Solution Development Fundamentals

    • 1 Comments

     

    • Enterprise Library. Enterprise Library is a collection of application blocks that address common cross-cutting concerns that developers face when developing applications. The latest version of Enterprise Library (version 6) was released in April 2013 and includes two new application blocks (Semantic Logging Application Block and Transient Fault Handling Application Block) and many improvements.

    The Enterprise Library 5.0 Integration Pack for Windows Azure is a collection of reusable application blocks that address common cross-cutting concerns in enterprise software development. The Microsoft Enterprise Library Integration Pack for Windows Azure is an extension to Microsoft Enterprise Library 5.0 that can be used with the Windows Azure technology platform. It includes the Autoscaling Application Block, Transient Fault Handling Application Block, blob configuration source, protected configuration provider, and learning materials.

    • Unity. Unity is a lightweight and extensible dependency injection container with support for interception. We recently released Unity 3.0 (also part of the latest version of Enterprise Library) which added a number of key features, including registration by convention and support for Windows Store apps. Unity provides a mature and stable foundation for building high-quality, flexible, pattern-based libraries and reference implementations. It facilitates loosely-coupled design and help improve testability.
    • Parallel Programming with Microsoft .NET This book describes patterns for parallel programming, with code examples, that use the new parallel programming support in the Microsoft® .NET Framework 4. This support is commonly referred to as the Parallel Extensions. You can use the patterns described in this book to improve your application's performance on multicore computers. Adopting the patterns in your code makes your application run faster today and also helps prepare for future hardware environments, which are expected to have an increasingly parallel computing architecture
    • Parallel Programming with Microsoft Visual C++ This book describes patterns for parallel programming, with code examples, that use the parallel programming support in the Microsoft® Visual C++. The Parallel Patterns Library (PPL) and the Asynchronous Agents Library introduce a new programming model for parallelism that significantly simplifies the job. Behind the scenes are sophisticated algorithms that dynamically distribute computations on multicore architectures. In addition, Microsoft® Visual Studio® 2010 development system includes debugging and analysis tools to support the new parallel programming model. You can use the patterns described in this book to improve your application's performance on multicore computers. Adopting the patterns in your code makes your application run faster today and also helps prepare for future hardware environments, which are expected to have an increasingly parallel computing architecture
    • CQRS Journey. This guidance is designed to help you get started with the Command & Query Responsibility Segregation and the Event Sourcing patterns. The guide is a journal that describes the experiences of a development team with no prior CQRS proficiency in building, deploying (to Windows Azure), and maintaining a sample real-world complex enterprise system to showcase various CQRS and ES concepts and techniques.
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