Brian Keller

Director of ALM Evangelism for Microsoft

Posts
  • Brian Keller

    Anybody still using WFC?

    • 1 Comments

    We are costing the amount of work required to port the J# WFC functionality to 64-bit. The WFC functionality was built to provide a smooth upgrade path from J++ to J#.

    If you are using WFC with J# and your application will eventually require 64-bit support, please email me - briankel at microsoft dot com. Please include details of your 64-bit usage scenario. Also, if you're using J# or JLCA and would like to join my customer list (who I semi-regularly poll for product planning inquiries) feel free to drop me a line as well. Tell me a bit about your application and its architecture in your email.

    Thanks!
    Brian Keller
    J# / JLCA Product Manager

  • Brian Keller

    Soma blogs about J#

    • 5 Comments

    Soma just posted a blog entry about J# and JLCA that I thought was pretty on-target with the direction I see J# and the JLCA headed. As product manager for our Java migration tools, people are always questioning our dedication to J#. The first reason might be because of our history with J++; but J# is independently developed by Microsoft with no Sun intellectual property, whereas J++ was a joint venture. When things went south with Sun, we had to stop working on J++ and will eventually have to stop supporting it. But J# is very different since it's not a joint venture with Sun. I'll spare all the legal details... <g>

    But the other reason people question our commitment to J# is that J# will never capture the same market share that C# and VB have. It's here for us to attract Java developers to the .NET Framework by providing a language and business logic functionality that they are already familiar with. Since many of these developers may also go to C#, and C# is also attracting a lot of C/C++ developers who want to work with managed code (Of course C/C++ also supports managed code but that's a whole other topic) we simply will never have the developer share that C# does. But it's still a very strategic language in Microsoft's offerings. Java is our #1 competitor in the application development space, so it only makes sense that we would provide the Java language as an entry point for developers who want to check out our platform. So are we committed? You bet. We've got some great features being added to J# in Visual Studio 2005 and more planned for Orcas.

    It's also nice to see Soma recognizing our MVP's who were just added to our Dev Center page. Those guys are true rock stars in my book! Talk about passion for the community! I still don't know what "Namaste" means when Soma signs his blog entries, but I hope to find out soon... <g>

  • Brian Keller

    Announcing XNA Studio

    • 1 Comments

    What do you get when you extend and customize Visual Studio 2005 Team System to be a first-class tool for teams to develop video games?

    XNA Studio. I know some of the guys on this team and have met with them about their vision. This should be HUGE for the video game development industry. Which, as a developer tools marketing guy who spends most of his free time playing video games, this is a dream come true!

  • Brian Keller

    .NET Framework survey about Code Access Security

    • 1 Comments

    The .NET Framework team is conducing a survey about partial trust and code access security. If you have a few minutes please share your feedback:

    http://host.ultimatesurvey.com/microsoft/surveys/takesurvey.aspx?surveyid=1030

  • Brian Keller

    Free training on the .NET Framework designed especially for Java developers

    • 3 Comments

    We are currently accepting registrations for a "Java to .NET Framework Migration Workshop." This workshop has two primary goals:

    1) Teach Java developers the conceptual mappings between Java and the .NET Framework. For example, as a Java developer you know how to use RMI - but how do you use .NET Remoting? You know how deployment and updates work in the Java world - but how do I handle deployments and updates with the .NET Framework-baesed applications I'm building?

    2) This course also teaches code migration. Maybe you want to migrate your existing Java-based applications in part or whole to the .NET Framework - there are several automated and manual ways to approach this, but which way is best for your code base?

    I would encourage you to sign up for these courses using the links below. And if you know other Java developers who might be interested, please pass it along. There is no charge for completing this course, but space is limited so sign up today.

    Session 1:         

    Date:

    Event Code: 

    Registration: 

    Other Information:

    Java to .NET Framework Migration

    February 28th, March 1st  and March 2nd from 1PM-5PM EST

    303369 – Use this Event ID when registering

    www.hp-microsoft.net/netdeveloper/

    You can only register for 1 event.  Limited space is available. 

    Deadline is Feb 25th.  

    Session 2:         

    Date:

    Event Code: 

    Registration: 

    Other Information:

    Java to .NET Framework Migration

    March 2nd, March 3rd and March 4th from 8AM-12PM EST

    303374 – Use this Event ID when registering

    www.hp-microsoft.net/netdeveloper/

    You can only register for 1 event.  Limited space is available. 

    Deadline is Feb 25th.  

  • Brian Keller

    Want to make sure your application runs great on the .NET Framework 2.0? Let us test it!

    • 0 Comments

    Check out Jay's latest blog entry.

    I think this is a great opportunity for companies who want to make sure their application runs well on the .NET Framework 2.0. This way we can ensure we have logged any bugs that might crop up when you migrate your application forward to the .NET Framework 2.0 - and with any luck, we'll have the problems fixed or workarounds posted before you ever encounter them in production. What more could you ask for? See Jay's blog for more details (link above).

  • Brian Keller

    Microsoft's tsunami relief donations

    • 0 Comments

    We received a mail today highlighting just some of Microsoft's contributions to the tsunami relief fund. I think it's amazing the amount of generosity the people at this company show. Here's a snippet of the email:

    As Steve announced in his e-mail of December 30th, Microsoft has made an initial contribution of $2 million to relief and recovery efforts.  We also estimated that we would donate an additional $1.5 million to match employee contributions.  While we still await comprehensive figures from our international subsidiaries, partial reporting shows that to-date employees have contributed more than $1.8 million, which Microsoft will match.  Offices around the world are raising funds in a variety of ways; in EMEA, employees contributed $420,000, to date. Microsoft India reports that 70% of employees have pledged a day of their salary for the relief efforts.  These are just two examples of the generosity of our employees.

    That's an average of $112 per employee, in addition to whatever money people donated separately from our internal matching drive. That makes me pretty proud to work here.

  • Brian Keller

    Students choose Visual J# over BlueJ, JCreator, and other IDE's

    • 14 Comments

    I received this note from Brian Scarbeau, a high school AP Computer Science teacher in Orlando, Florida.

    Thought I’d pass this along. . . My AP students are now using the MBCS hands on.  I don’t require them to use an IDE and they choose either bluej, JCreator or VS. Some started to use Visual Studio for the first time today and they were blown away by the intellisense and how easy it was to use. Needless to say that got the attention of the other students that were using the other ide’s. Guess what IDE all my students will be using tomorrow in class?

    At Microsoft we spend lots of time, money, and energy educating the academic community about the merits of our tools and platform, but we obviously can't talk to every student or teacher out there. So when students independently choose Visual Studio over other IDE's - without any influence from their teacher - it reminds that we're building a development tool that makes life easier for millions of people - students and professional developers alike.

    One of the main reasons I came to Microsoft to do marketing in the Visual Studio group is because of my academic experience. I graduated from the University of Florida (Go Gators!) the same semester that Microsoft released Visual Studio .NET. I remember reading about the product and trying it for the first time and being so amazed at the capabilities. The only unfortunate part about my experience was that the timing of my education didn't permit me to use Visual Studio .NET as part of my college career since it wasn't released yet. So when I was given the opportunity to come work for Microsoft and help teachers and students realize how Visual Studio .NET could help them be successful in their college careers and beyond, I couldn't pass up the opportunity. I am living my dream job every day, and my only regret is that I don't have more hours in the day with which to code. =)

  • Brian Keller

    Incredible tsunami satellite photos

    • 2 Comments

    http://homepage.mac.com/demark/tsunami/

    Set 5 is one of the most incredible in my opinion…

     

    And in a completely tangential thought, I wonder if my deodorant (Axe "Tsunami") will be renamed or discontinued now that there are such terrible connotations with the word. XBox Live!'s codename "Tsunami" infrastructure updates ended up being an unfortunate selection.

  • Brian Keller

    Christmas lights Web site scam

    • 3 Comments

    Man admits Christmas lights Web site scam

    I really don't understand this at all.
    1) He went to all the trouble of building a site with pictures that made it look like you could control the Christmas lights at his house from the Web with still photos. Even went to the extra detail of adding planes and cars for realism. If he's that dedicated, though, why couldn't he also add a serial port interface to his Web server to control (what appears to be) an X10 setup?
    2) Is he really the first person to come up with this idea? I mean, years after the first vending machine Web cam it seems that plenty of other people would have setup similar, real Web-activated Christmas light decorations.
    3) Are reporters really that naive? Thankfully somebody finally asked to see how it works. But what about The Wall Street Journal?
    4) How did he get not only his wife, but his neighbors as well, in on the scam? This guy must be pretty charismatic.

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