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  • Microsoft Press

    I. M. Wright: “Spontaneous combustion of rancid management”

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    Catching up on an I. M. Wright podcast from November we missed posting. Here’s the “Hard Code” blog post , and here’s the podcast of that post . I. M. starts like this: What's good for you isn't always good for your group. Obvious, right? You can call it local versus global optimization. You can get geek philosophical about it and say, "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few…or the one." Or you can simply notice the difference you feel between zany ideas from the intern (cool) versus zany ideas from your general manager (scary). For example, spontaneity in an individual is a good thing and unvarying predictability makes Jack a dull boy. But when Jack is running a large enterprise, unpredictability can wreak havoc. There are managers who grow up and learn this lesson...
  • Microsoft Press

    William Stanek: On Windows Server 2008 R2

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    William here. I wrote the November 2009 cover story for TechNet Magazine to provide an advanced primer for Windows Server 2008 R2. Now Windows Server 2008 R2 is here in a big way and you can learn all about its key features in my new book Windows Server 2008 Administrator’s Pocket Consultant, Second Edition (updated for R2). With this new book, I did things a bit differently than I’ve done in the past. For starters, I put my many months of experience working with R2 to work, with my many years of Windows Server experience behind it, to ensure I took as comprehensive a look as possible while still keeping the discussion clear and concise. What I found was that R2 had been tweaked in many more ways than most people realized, and I was one of the first to spell out exactly how so in my TechNet...
  • Microsoft Press

    Jeffrey Richter: Excerpt #1 from CLR via C#, Third Edition

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    Good morning everyone, Jeffrey Richter here. Today I thought I’d share a section of my new book, CLR via C#, Third Edition , with you. It’s from Chapter 26, “Compute-Bound Asynchronous Operations.” The section discusses how to flow contextual information from one thread to another thread by using the CLR’s Execution Context infrastructure. During the discussion, I go into the security and performance details of this feature as well. Execution Contexts Every thread has an execution context data structure associated with it. The execution context includes things such as security settings (compressed stack, Thread ’s Principal property, and Windows identity), host settings (see System.Threading. HostExecutionContextManager ), and logical call context data (see System.Runtime. Remoting.Messaging...
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #8: Overestimate resource capacity

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    Carl here. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series. This week: #8: Overestimate Resource Capacity For many projects, the capacity of work resources is a critical factor in the success or failure of the project. Work capacity is something you should be able to accurately estimate, quantify, and manage throughout the planning and execution of any complex project. This is especially true for projects that are deadline-driven and requires highly specialized people to complete the work--many projects involving knowledge workers fall into this...
  • Microsoft Press

    Highlights from the 2009 Microsoft Professional Developer’s Conference (PDC)

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    Get your UCMA poster here, which illustrates all the classes and interfaces to the Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA). UCMA is a powerful server-side API to build custom applications that leverage the Office Communications Server platform....
  • Microsoft Press

    Author news: Carl Chatfield starts a blog on Project!

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    Carl Chatfield, coauthor of Microsoft Office Project 2007 Step by Step and four other books on Project, has launched the ProjHugger blog (at www.projhugger.com) for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. It’s updated each Monday morning....
  • Microsoft Press

    2009 Best in Show winner: Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2 Resource Kit

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    Technorati Tags: Microsoft Press , Office Communications Server , books , award The Society for Technical Communications is an international organization of technical communicators whose purpose is to foster quality in print and online technical publications. Other competitors at the local level (Puget Sound region) included Microsoft UA teams and organizations like Boeing, Hewlett-Packard, and King County. This past Tuesday night Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2 Resource Kit won Best in Show in this year’s STC competition. The STC president remarked that the decision ultimately came down to the fact that this book was just really well written. More winners from Microsoft Press and Next Level of Competition This year Microsoft Press entered five books in the Technical...
  • Microsoft Press

    I. M. Wright: “Are we functional?”

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    “When Steven Sinofsky and Jon DeVaan took on joint management of Windows 7, they made several significant changes to the entire organization. Two profound changes were creating a single centralized plan and switching to a functional organizational structure. Given the success of Windows 7, some Microsoft engineers are asking, ‘If my PUM is a bum—is it time to throw the bums out?’"...
  • Microsoft Press

    Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate

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    It’s here.
  • Microsoft Press

    Ed Wilson: My Kingdom for a horse

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    I read Richard III over the weekend. This play is like the Casablanca of Shakespearean writings as it is chock full of famous quotes: “Play it again Sam” … wait, that was Casablanca. But how about “Now is the season of our discontent.” Or my favorite, “A horse, A horse. My kingdom for a horse!” After reading the line, that effectively draws to a conclusion this really interesting English monarch, I sat back closed my eyes, and thought about this. “My kingdom for a horse…” Maybe dear old Richard III was not such a bad guy after all. He loves his horse. In my mind’s eye, I saw Smokey … the solid black Quarter horse of my youth. The endless summer days we spent together. Smokey was clever, playful, ornery, and always unpredictable. He was without a doubt the smartest horse I knew … and I...
  • Microsoft Press

    RTM’d today: Windows 7: The Best of the Official Magazine

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    We’re happy to announce that Windows 7: The Best of the Official Magazine (Microsoft Press, 2010; ISBN 9780735626645; 224 pages), by the Editors of the Official Windows Magazine shipped to the printer this week! This is the ultimate visual guide to the fun, practical ways you can use Windows 7 in everyday life: Get Started Chapter 1: Introducing… · 12 reasons why you’ll love Windows 7 · Get ready: Action stations! · Interact with the Interface · Jump Start: The Taskbar and Start Menu · Hardware help: Device control at your fingertips · Take note, and get creative: WordPad, Paint and Sticky Notes Chapter 2 Your first hour · Introducing Windows 7 · Join the Library · Start: what’s really on the menu · Those handy little helpers: desktop gadget Explore...
  • Microsoft Press

    MSL news: Train, Practice, Certify on Windows 7

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    Julie Lary here, of Microsoft Learning, with a quick note about our resources available for Windows 7. Anticipating the rapid adoption of Windows 7 , Microsoft Learning has introduced numerous training and certification resources and offers to help IT professionals and developers get up to speed quickly. Many of these resources, including certification upgrade paths, are now available on a single Web page . Even if your company doesn’t plan to standardize on Windows 7 this year, it’s not too early to start exploring your options. P.S. from Devon: You can find Microsoft Press’s offerings in the Practice section of each tab and also here .
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #5: Expect that automatic resource leveling should be able to alter reality

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    Carl here. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series, which started like this: #10 , #9 , #8 , #7 , and #6 . Problem #5: Expect that automatic resource leveling should be able to alter reality Resource leveling is the amazing Project feature that does some impressive math tricks to smooth out resource allocation problems, but produces a result that you often do not want—an extended finish date. Don’t blame Project though, it can’t alter reality. You know the expression, you can't have your cake and eat it too? Walk a mile in my...
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #7: Don’t distinguish work from duration

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    Carl here again. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series, which started like this: #10 , #9 , and #8 . And here’s #7: Problem #7: Don't distinguish work from duration Project measures both duration and work values in increments of time, but duration gets a lot more visibility in the Project UI. In fact work only steps into the picture when you assign a resource to a task, and even then you need to dig a little to see work values. When you assign resources in your project plans, you may need to clearly distinguish the amount of work the...
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #6: Don't reign in effort-driven scheduling when it shouldn't apply

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    Carl here. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series, which started like this: #10 , #9 , #8 , and #7 . Problem #6: Don't reign in effort-driven scheduling when it shouldn't apply Some things make perfect sense in one context but perfect nonsense in a different context. Effort-driven scheduling is one such thing. It's a powerful feature in Project that you should know well. The basic idea of effort-driven scheduling (or EDS to its friends) is simple enough: if one person working full-time on one task should take, say, 20 days to complete...
  • Microsoft Press

    Visual Studio 2010 RC available via MSDN

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    Here’s another quick post today, just to let you know that the Visual Studio 2010 & .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate is now available to MSDN subscribers . For more information on this RC, see Jason Zander’s blog (and check Somasegar’s blog later). The Release Candidate will be available to the public on February 10. Here's a link to a survey via which you can give feedback about the RC: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=183244 .
  • Microsoft Press

    Ebook for Richter’s CLR via C#, Third Edition, now available

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    Many of you have written to ask whether an ebook for Jeffrey Richter’s CLR via C#, Third Edition (Print ISBN: 978-0-7356-2704-8; 896 pages), would be available for sale and, if yes, when. Here’s a quick post to say that the ebook (in multiple formats) is now available here . You can purchase the ebook at a discount if you buy the book, or you can purchase the ebook separately. Enjoy!
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