Der deutsche Education Blog

October, 2013

Microsoft Research Connections Blog

The Microsoft Research Connections blog shares stories of collaborations with computer scientists at academic and scientific institutions to advance technical innovations in computing, as well as related events, scholarships, and fellowships.

October, 2013

  • Microsoft Research Connections Blog

    SEIF issues 2014 awards RFP

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    Software Engineering Innovation Foundation 2014Today, October 29, 2013, the Microsoft Research Connections Computer Science Group—in conjunction with the Research in Software Engineering Group (RiSE), the Sensing and Energy Research Group, and Global Foundation Services—is officially issuing the request for proposals for the Software Engineering Innovation Foundation (SEIF) 2014 awards. You’ll find more information below on the 2014 RFP.

    This marks the fifth RFP since SEIF’s founding. A lot has happened since its formation in 2010, but the goals of the foundation and its annual SEIF Awards have remained constant. As Judith Bishop, director of computer science at Microsoft Research Connections, so ably stated then, “It is these three aspects—education, life, and industry—that the Software Engineering Innovation Foundation Awards were set up to address.”

    Today, we can point to amazing SEIF research projects in all three of these areas. For example, Professor Pankaj Jalote of IIIT Delhi, in India, developed a hands-on software engineering curriculum while working on his SEIF 2010 project, “An Integrated Approach for Software Engineering Projects using Visual Studio Platform.” Professor Nilanjan Banerjee of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, United States, is working to help people with disabilities live fuller lives through his SEIF 2013 project, “Wearable Multi-Sensor Gesture Recognition in Assistive Devices for Paralysis.” And a number of SEIF research projects are addressing the challenges of software development at industrial scale—for instance, the SEIF 2011 project “Augmenting Social Awareness in a Collaborative Development Environment” of Professor of Filippo Lanubile of the University of Bari, Italy. For more information on past winners, visit the SEIF website.

    As we gear up SEIF’s fifth RFP, we will be holding a SEIF workshop in Rio de Janeiro on November 25–26, 2013. This workshop—which will bring together Brazilian scientists, Microsoft researchers, and past SEIF awardees—is intended to advance the state of software engineering in Brazil. It will also provide an opportunity to discuss the proposal guidelines for the SEIF 2014 RFP. Our focus areas this year are:

    • Software engineering in and for the cloud
    • Data analytics for software development and engineering
    • Programming paradigms and software engineering tools for the Internet of Things
    • Tools for testing and verification
    • Tools and technologies challenging computer science education in general, and teaching of programming in particular
    • Empowering end users with program synthesis
    • Programming in the presence of uncertainty and approximation
    • Infrastructure for cloud-scale software
      • Server, storage, interconnect, and data center architecture and design
      • Intra- and inter-data center networking
      • Resource models and resource-aware programming models
      • Resource provisioning, monitoring, and control for cloud computing

    We are pleased this year to welcome the involvement of Sensing and Energy Research Group in the RFP, as well as Global Foundation Services, which is encouraging submissions for research in software engineering for Internet-scale cloud services.

    The deadline for this year’s proposals is January 31, 2014. We will announce winners by March 24, 2014. We are looking forward to another year of SEIF, and another exciting set of research projects.

    Arjmand Samuel, Senior Research Program Manager, Microsoft Research Connections

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  • Microsoft Research Connections Blog

    Bringing the heavens into the schoolhouse

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    In the five years since Microsoft Research initially launched the WorldWide Telescope (WWT), the product’s many features have been put to a variety of uses. Today in Chongqing, China, we saw yet another first for WorldWide Telescope: the unveiling of the first WWT-driven planetarium in China. The 8-meter dome installation is at the Shixinlu primary school and is powered by six high-resolution projectors. This installation enables students not only to see and study the stars and the universe in an immersive planetarium setting, but it also allows them to create their own tours of the heavens and have them displayed on the dome.

    The first WWT-driven planetarium in China was unveiled at the Shixinlu primary school in Chongqing.
    The first WWT-driven planetarium in China was unveiled at the Shixinlu primary school in Chongqing on October 23.

    I represented the WorldWide Telescope team at the grand unveiling of the dome, and as I did so, I was struck by the impact our small research project has had around the world. Even more so, I was in awe of the vision of Dr. Chenzhou Cui from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, who saw the potential of teaching and inspiring students via a planetarium placed directly in the school and who collaborated with Microsoft Research Asia to implement this vision via WorldWide Telescope. Dr. Cui and Mrs. Kailiang Song, the director of the school, worked tirelessly to get the installation built and running in six months and to provide a great environment for WWT. And above all, it is great to see the potential for many more students to gain a better understanding of astronomy by being immersed in the stars.

    Dan Fay represented the WorldWide Telescope team at the dome's unveiling.
    Representing the WorldWide Telescope team at the dome's unveiling, Fay was awed by the vision of Dr. Chenzhou Cui from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, who recognized the educational potential of WorldWide Telescope.

    The ability to use WorldWide Telescope in a multi-machine and multi-projector setup to display on planetarium domes is one of the features included in the Windows desktop client. The WWT client is freely available at www.worldwidetelescope.org.

    Dan Fay, Director of Earth, Energy, and Environment; Microsoft Research Connections

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