October, 2011

  

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Microsoft Research Twentieth Anniversary

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    20th_TOCIntroAd

    Microsoft Research Twentieth Anniversary

    In the 20 years since it was founded, Microsoft Research has worked consistently to help shape computer science and scientific research in the digital age. Through Microsoft Research Connections’ collaborative efforts, we link dedicated researchers at Microsoft Research worldwide labs with the top minds in academia, pushing the boundaries of technology to tackle some of the world’s most pressing problems. Together, we encourage the next generation of world-class computer scientists and provide support to great thinkers who dream the impossible.

    Review some of our past accomplishments and get an idea of our goals for the future:

    · Microsoft Research Twentieth Anniversary

    · Science@Microsoft

    · Happy Birthday, Microsoft Research…Now Blow out the Candles and Back to the Lab

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    WorldWide Telescope SDK Features

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    WorldWide Telescope SDK Features

    The powerful tools contained in the WorldWide Telescope (WWT) SDK enable developers to create applications that allow users to import and visualize their data in the WWT Windows Client and share it with others.

    The WWT SDK can convert flat images of the entire Earth, a section of the Earth, or of any other planetary body, into a format that will render in full 3-D in the WWT.


    The WorldWide Telescope (WWT) was featured in the Morrison Planetarium for NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences on September 29. This is the largest all-digital planetarium in the world, Morrison Planetarium’s state-of-the-art projector and software technologies allow the planetarium to produce the most accurate and interactive digital universe simulation.

    The WWT software displayed imagery from the best ground- and space-based telescopes in the world on the 75-foot wide planetarium screen.

    Learn
    how to build a planetarium for use with WWT.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Microsoft Dynamics Academic Alliance Workshop 2011 in Europe

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    Microsoft DynamicsThe Microsoft Dynamics Academic Alliance Workshop 2011 is a 1 1/2 day event to be held at Avans Hogeschool, University of Applied Science in 's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands, November 28-29, 2011.

    Professors and educators will come together to enhance their knowledge of Microsoft Dynamics and the use of technology in the classroom. This event offers an opportunity to collaborate with educators and learn more about the world of Microsoft Dynamics, and provides an important forum for the exchange of ideas and information for current and prospective Microsoft Dynamics Academic Alliance members.

    There is no cost for this workshop, but registration is required. Please visit the Workshop 2011 event page on Faculty Connection for more information about this event and how to attend.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Celebrating 20 Years of Success at Microsoft Research

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    Celebrating 20 Years of Success

    27 September marked the 20 year anniversary of Microsoft Research (MSR). To celebrate this milestone the six worldwide labs hosted a series of co-ordinated events. Beginning in Beijing, Craig Mundie kicked off the proceedings, followed by Bangalore, Cambridge, the lab in New England and then Silicon Valley and Redmond.

    To an audience of academics, media and staff, host Gareth Mitchell of the BBC and Imperial College, started the Cambridge UK event by inviting Rick Rashid, Nathan Myhrvold and a series of others to talk about the impact of MSR via pre-recorded video. Gareth then handed the stage over to lab director Andrew Blake, who spoke in more detail about the history of MSR, particular achievements of the Cambridge lab and set the tone for an event that celebrated how proud and excited we all are to be part of Microsoft Research. Showcasing the breadth of basic research from the lab, the audience heard from panellists about the future of software verification, speakers on subjects including programming life, why we build data centers like we do, the future of looking back, model-based machine learning for e-health records, medical imaging in the hospital and finally NUI panellists discussing and demoing the future of digital interaction. All this was sandwiched around an open demo-fest for visitors to wander freely, meet with researchers and experience some of our latest projects for themselves.

    From feedback received, it seems that attendees thoroughly enjoyed the event. To quote one academic “Naturally, I had high expectations for the day. Microsoft exceeded them. I was particularly impressed to see the continued emphasis on fundamental and theoretical work- this is a great tribute to Microsoft's focus on contributing to the state-of-the-art."

    We have seen a number of media articles from those that attended. The first main piece being a glowing report on KinectFusion, which was demoed during the NUI panel session: Kinect Project Merges Real and Virtual Worlds (MIT, Technology Review) and another being a three page article in c't magazin (with a prime score of 200).

    Check out the Microsoft Research Anniversary web site and blog for more about what went on during the worldwide celebration.

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